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Severe wildfires burning 8 times more area in western U.S., study findsAn exponential increase in high-severity fires threatens a forest's ability to return to its normal state.

CBS News Shared .

C.D.C. Officials Shorten Recommended Quarantine PeriodsThe agency also urged Americans to stay home during the coming holidays, and to get tested if they do travel.

The New York Times Shared .

Many Trial Volunteers Got Placebo Vaccines. Do They Now Deserve the Real Ones?Some vaccine experts worry that "unblinding" the trials and giving all of the volunteers vaccines would tarnish the long-term results.

The New York Times Shared .

Marine Researchers Discover Largest Aggregation of Fishes Ever Observed at Abyssal DepthsMarine biologists from the United States and the United Kingdom have recorded over 100 deep water-dwelling cutthroat eels, identified as Ilyophis arx, at a 1 kg bait package deployed on an abyssal seamount summit in the southwestern Clarion-Clipperton Zone in the central Pacific Ocean.

Sci News Shared .

Space breakthrough: Astronomers map out 1 million previously unknown galaxiesSPACE experts have completed the most detailed survey of the southern sky ever attempted with radio waves.

Express Shared .

Embryo Frozen 27 Years Ago Results In Record-Breaking BirthMolly Gibson was born in October from an embryo that was frozen in 1992. Hers is the oldest-known embryo to result in a successful birth.

All That's Interesting Shared .

Upper Paleolithic Figurines Showing Women with Obesity May Be Linked to Climate ChangeIn a new paper, published in the journal Obesity, a team of researchers from the University of Colorado and the American University of Sharjah suggests that ‘Venus' figurines show greater obesity during the time of the glacier advance and less during the glacier retreat, and the figurines of women closest to the glaciers show the greatest...

Sci News Shared .

CVS to Give Out Covid-19 Treatment in Nursing HomesThe three-month pilot program involves just 1,000 doses in seven big cities. It's not clear how much impact that will have as demand surges.

The New York Times Shared .

Singapore Approves a Lab-Grown Meat Product, a Global FirstThe approval for a U.S. start-up's "cultured chicken" product is a small victory for the nascent laboratory meat industry.

The New York Times Shared .
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Moderna to Begin Testing Its Coronavirus Vaccine in ChildrenThe company said the trial would involve children ages 12 through 17.

The New York Times Shared .

The UK Just Approved the Pfizer Covid Vaccine. What Happens Next?When early results from the final trials began to roll in, scientists were well prepared.

The New York Times Shared .

Shark attack: 'No single reason' for record high in unprovoked shark bitesSHARK ATTACKS appear increasingly commonplace and the southern hemisphere may see this disturbing trend continue, an expert has warned.

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Best region for life on Mars was far below surfaceThe most habitable region for life on Mars would have been up to several miles below its surface, likely due to subsurface melting of thick ice sheets fueled by geothermal heat, a Rutgers-led study concludes.

Phys.org Shared .

Flightless birds more common globally before human-driven extinctionsThere would be at least four times as many flightless bird species on Earth today if it were not for human influences, finds a study led by UCL researchers.

Phys.org Shared .

'Message in a bottle' tracks plastic pollutionElectronic tags released in the Ganges river show plastic pollution can travel thousands of kilometres in just a few months.

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African trade routes sketched out by mediaeval beadsThe origin of glass beads dates back to early ancient times. The chemical composition of the beads and their morphological and technical characteristics can reveal where they come from; this information can then be used to reconstruct the trade channels between glass production areas and the sites where the beads were used at different times.

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What's killing killer whales? Orca report covering a decade of necropsies identifies threatsPathology reports on more than 50 killer whales stranded over nearly a decade in the northeast Pacific and Hawaii show that orcas face a variety of mortal threats—many stemming from human interactions.

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The making of mysterious mazes: How animals got their complex colorationsWhy do leopards have spots and zebras have stripes? Many biologists have tried to answer these questions and have provided interesting hypotheses, including camouflage, thermoregulation, and insect repellent.

Phys.org Shared .

Piers Corbyn found guilty of breaching regulations at lockdown protestBrother of former Labour leader spoke at May event in London's Hyde Park.

The Guardian Shared .

2020 Is a Record Year for Disaster Shelters, Red Cross SaysScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

U.K. is first to clear Pfizer's COVID-19 vaccine for emergency usePfizer will deliver the first of 40 million doses of its coronavirus vaccine promised to the United Kingdom in the coming days.

Science News Shared .

The Guardian view on a vaccination programme: keep politics out of itEditorial: There is a job of public reassurance ahead that will be made harder if partisanship and ministerial grandstanding get in the way.

The Guardian Shared .

'The scientists have done it': Boris Johnson hails Covid vaccinePM says news brings ‘sure and certain knowledge' that people can reclaim their lives.

The Guardian Shared .

ASKAP Radio Telescope Maps Nearly Three Million GalaxiesAstronomers using CSIRO's Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder have mapped approximately 3,000,000 galaxies in the observable Universe.

Sci News Shared .

COVID patient with sepsis makes 'remarkable' recovery following megadose of vitamin CA young Australian man who was critically ill with COVID-19 and suffering early stages of blood poisoning made a remarkable recovery after being given massive doses of vitamin C, according to his doctors.

ABC Science News Shared .

Yellowstone volcano: 100 earthquakes hit US supervolcanoYELLOWSTONE volcano was struck by 100 earthquakes in November as fears grow the US supervolcano is overdue another blast - but is Yellowstone volcano going to erupt?

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End of the world: The Solar System will disintegrate faster than thought 'system unstable'Scientists and philosophers have been preoccupied by the Solar System's ultimate demise for centuries. Astronomers now know our Sun will transform into a dead lump of rock, in a thousand trillion years.

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Dr. Michael Davidson, Who Studied Infectious Disease, Dies at 77He told a friend that he would have relished the chance to help end the coronavirus pandemic had he still been active in the field.

The New York Times Shared .

Roly polies transfer environmental toxins to threatened fish populations in CaliforniaRoly poly bugs may be a source of fun for kids and adults but these little bugs that form into balls at the slightest touch are causing problems for some threatened fish.

Phys.org Shared .

Investigating the Active Components of an Herbal MushroomWhen people think of traditional medicine, often what comes to mind are the old herbal medical practices in Asian countries.

LabRoots Shared .

Amphibian die-offs worsened malaria outbreaks in Central AmericaThe global collapse of frogs and other amphibians due to the amphibian chytrid fungus exacerbated malaria outbreaks in Costa Rica and Panama during the 1990s and 2000s, according to new research.

Phys.org Shared .

Ozone breaks down THC deposited on surfaces from thirdhand cannabis smokeSecond - and thirdhand tobacco smoke have received lots of attention, but much less is known about the compounds deposited on surfaces from cannabis smoke.

Phys.org Shared .

Greenland ice sheet faces irreversible meltingIn a study published this week in The Cryosphere, researchers from the National Centre for Atmospheric Science and University of Reading demonstrate how climate change could lead to irreversible sea level rise as temperatures continue to rise and the Greenland ice sheet continues to decline.

Phys.org Shared .

Plant-inspired alkaloids protect rice, kiwi and citrus from harmful bacteriaPlants get bacterial infections, just as humans do. When food crops and trees are infected, their yield and quality can suffer.

Phys.org Shared .

Researchers determine how the SARS-CoV-2 virus hijacks and rapidly causes damage to human lung cellsIn a multi-group collaborative involving the National Emerging Infectious Disease Laboratories , the Center for Regenerative Medicine , and the Center for Network Systems Biology , scientists have reported the first map of the molecular responses of human lung cells to infection by SARS-CoV-2.

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An archaeological project analyzes informal commerce in the colonial CaribbeanThe historical archaeologist Konrad A. Antczak, a Marie Skłodowska-Curie researcher with the UPF Department of Humanities and member of the Research Group on Colonialism, Gender and Materialities , has recently returned from archaeological fieldwork in the Dutch islands of Curaçao and Bonaire, in the southern Caribbean.

Phys.org Shared .

Researchers develop new class of plant nanobionic sensor to monitor arsenic levels in soilScientists from Disruptive and Sustainable Technologies for Agricultural Precision , an Interdisciplinary Research Group at the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology , MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, have engineered a novel type of plant nanobionic optical sensor that can detect and monitor, in real-time, levels of the...

Phys.org Shared .

Method could improve SARS-CoV-2 testing in variety of sewage systemsWith the purpose of contributing to a monitoring or early-warning system for pandemic spread through a given region, a Swedish research team has reportedly optimized a method for concentrating SARS-CoV-2 particles in municipal sewage systems.

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Carbon dioxide converted to ethylene—the 'rice of the industry'In recent times, electrochemical conversion technology—which converts carbon dioxide to high-value-added compounds using renewable electricity—has gained research attention as a carbon capture utilization technology.

Phys.org Shared .

A machine learning solution for designing materials with desired optical propertiesUnderstanding how matter interacts with light—its optical properties—is critical in a myriad of energy and biomedical technologies, such as targeted drug delivery, quantum dots, fuel combustion, and cracking of biomass.

Phys.org Shared .

Electronic waste on the decline, new study findsA new study, led by a researcher at the Yale School of the Environment's Center for Industrial Ecology and published recently in the Journal of Industrial Ecology, has found that the total mass of electronic waste generated by Americans has been declining since 2015.

Phys.org Shared .

Protein molecules in cells function as miniature antennasResearchers led by Josef Lazar of the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences have demonstrated that molecules of fluorescent proteins act as antennas with optical properties dependent on their spatial orientation.

Phys.org Shared .

UK coronavirus live: Boris Johnson leads Downing Street briefing after vaccine approved for useLatest updates: PM holds press conference after earlier warning people not to ‘get hopes up too soon' about early vaccination.

The Guardian Shared .

Natural three-dimensional nonlinear photonic crystalNonlinear photonic crystals are transparent materials that have a spatially uniform linear susceptibility, yet a periodically modulated quadratic nonlinear susceptibility.

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Researchers Sequence Genome of Tomato's Wild AncestorScientists at Boyce Thompson Institute have produced a high-quality chromosome-scale genome sequence for the currant tomato Solanum pimpinellifolium, the wild progenitor of the modern cultivated tomato Solanum lycopersicum.

Sci News Shared .

Liz Hall obituaryOther lives: Psychotherapist who wrote a handbook for female survivors of sexual abuse.

The Guardian Shared .

China Moon landing pictures: See Chang'e 5's first images from the surface of the MoonCHINA'S Chang'e 5 probe has landed on the Moon on a historic mission to collect the first lunar rock samples in four decades.

Express Shared .

How will the continents come back together again?New research presented at the annual meeting of the American Geophysical Union highlights the future of our continents - a future which suggests rene - Earth And The Environment.

LabRoots Shared .

New microscope technique reveals details of droplet nucleationNucleation is a ubiquitous phenomenon that governs the formation of both droplets and bubbles in systems used for condensation, desalination, water splitting, crystal growth, and many other important industrial processes.

Phys.org Shared .

Researchers improve the measurement of a fundamental physical constantThe validation and application of theories in physics require the measurement of universal values known as fundamental constants.

Phys.org Shared .

Continents prone to destruction in their infancy, study findsMonash University geologists have shed new light on the early history of the Earth through their discovery that continents were weak and prone to destruction in their infancy.

Phys.org Shared .

Visualisation reveals how a protein 'hunkers down' to conserve energyA visualization made from nearly 100,000 electron microscope images has revealed the ingenious way a protein involved in muscle activity shuts itself down to conserve energy.

Phys.org Shared .

New glue sticks easily, holds strongly, and is a gas to pull apartTemporary glues may not steal headlines, but they can make everyday life easier.

Phys.org Shared .

Self-repairing gelatin-based film could be a smart move for electronicsDropping a cell phone can sometimes cause superficial cracks to appear. But other times, the device can stop working altogether because fractures develop in the material that stores data.

Phys.org Shared .

Active camouflage artificial skin in visible-to-infrared rangeCephalopods' exceptional ability to hide against any background has inspired researchers to replicate their fascinating ability to camouflage in the infrared and visible spectrum.

Phys.org Shared .

France will carry out border checks to stop skiers from spreading CovidCoronavirus clusters in Alpine resorts played key role in early spread of virus in Europe.

The Guardian Shared .

Scientists invent a new type of microscope that can see through an intact skullNon-invasive microscopic techniques such as optical coherence microscopy and two-photon microscopy are commonly used for in vivo imaging of living tissues.

Phys.org Shared .

New butterfly-inspired hydrogen sensor is powered by lightInspired by the surface of butterfly wings, researchers have developed a light-activated hydrogen sensor that produces ultra-precise results at room temperature.

Phys.org Shared .

Astronomers search for hidden message from God in background of the UniverseASTRONOMERS have been searching for a 'message' which may have been left by the creator of the Universe hidden within the cosmos.

Express Shared .

UK spider warning: False widows bites deliver bacteria to humansFALSE widow spiders can transfer harmful bacteria when they bite humans, according to a new study.

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Photonics meets surface science in a cheap and accurate sensor for biological liquidsSkoltech researchers and their colleagues from Russia and Israel have come up with a new, simple and inexpensive method of testing liquid biological samples that can be further developed to work in clinical settings, including real-time testing during surgery.

Phys.org Shared .

Biomedical engineers find active particles swim against the currentResearchers are beginning to understand the behavior of so-called "active" particles, which, if it can be controlled, has potential implications for engineered drug delivery systems and smart 3-D printing, according to an interdisciplinary Penn State research team.

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Valuing 'natural capital' vital to avoid next pandemic, global experts warnPandemics will emerge more often, kill more people than COVID-19 and do even more damage to the world economy unless urgent steps are taken to address risk drivers such as deforestation, warns a major new report on biodiversity and pandemics.

Phys.org Shared .

Newly discovered ghostly circles in the sky can't be explained by current theories, astronomers excitedIn September 2019, my colleague Anna Kapinska gave a presentation showing interesting objects she'd found while browsing our new radio astronomical data.

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Researchers ask public for help finding lingering ash treesThe search is on for lingering ash, those rare trees that have managed to survive the deadly onslaught of the emerald ash borer.

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Entry barriers for women are amplified by AI in recruitment algorithms, study findsHuman gender biases that limit recruitment opportunities for women are mimicked and exacerbated by artificial intelligence used for sorting resumés, according to new research.

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Science confirms what we all know: Gentrification disproportionately affects minoritiesA new study by a Stanford sociologist has determined that the negative effects of gentrification are felt disproportionately by minority communities, whose residents have fewer options of neighborhoods they can move to compared to their white counterparts.

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Creating a next-generation photonic-electronic integration circuitGlobal internet is growing at a compound rate of 24% per year, reaching 3.3 zettabytes per year by 2021.

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Dark energy camera snaps deepest photo yet of galactic siblingsImages from the Survey of the MAgellanic Stellar History reveal a striking family portrait of our galactic neighbors—the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds.

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HETDEX project on track to probe dark energyThree years into its quest to reveal the nature of dark energy, the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment is on track to complete the largest map of the cosmos ever.

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Cell membranes in super resolutionExpansion microscopy enables the imaging of cells and their components with a spatial resolution far below 200 nanometres.

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The very lonely seismometer: A 'dormant' earthquake monitoring program's last remnantsIn mid-November 2020, we received an email from one Karl Zuk. It regarded a hike he had just taken at Mountain Lakes Park, a hilly, forested area about 60 miles north of New York City, owned by Westchester County.

Phys.org Shared .

SOHO's pioneering 25 years in orbitThe ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory has been observing the Sun for 25 years. In that time, SOHO has observed two of the Sun's 11-year sunspot cycles, as solar activity waxes and wanes.

Phys.org Shared .

China lands spacecraft on moon to collect lunar rocksChina is collecting lunar rocks and soil to help scientists learn about the moon's origins, formation and volcanic activity on its surface.

The Guardian Shared .

Singapore approves sale of lab-grown chicken nuggets in world firstSingapore has given a US start-up the green light to sell lab-grown chicken meat, in what the firm says is the world's first regulatory approval for so-called "clean meat" that does not come from slaughtered animals.

ABC Science News Shared .

Cutting UK overseas aid could harm the fight against future pandemicsFunding for global research into zoonotic diseases such as Covid-19, Ebola and Sars is indispensable, argue professors Matthew Baylis and Fiona Tomley.

The Guardian Shared .

Satellites can see the pollution trails from individual shipsAll hands have to be on deck if the world is going to tackle degradation, and one of the biggest emitters is also one of the least well shipping.

Phys.org Shared .

Green Mediterranean Diet Better than Original Version, New Study SuggestsNew research suggests that additional restriction of meat intake with a parallel increase in plant-based, protein-rich foods may further benefit the cardiometabolic state and reduce cardiovascular risk, beyond the known beneficial effects of the traditional Mediterranean diet.

Sci News Shared .

Novel biocatalytic membrane removes micropollutants in an efficient and stable wayMicropollutants such as endocrine disrupters, pesticides and pharmaceuticals have detrimental effects on public health and aquatic ecosystems, even at trace level.

Phys.org Shared .

Digital Platform Watches for a Silent COVID KillerTo this end, scientists from the National University of Singapore have created an open-sourced system that wirelessly measures oxygen levels taken from Bluetooth-enabled pulse oximeters and transmits these readings to an e-dashboard.

LabRoots Shared .

A Vaccine Shield Against Shingles for Cancer PatientsReceiving a vaccine triggers an immune response without the symptoms of infection. This is like a drill that "trains" the immune system to recognize and destroy the pathogen should it be encountered in the future.

LabRoots Shared .

Novel metal-organic framework nanosheets developed for anticorrosive coatingThe marine functional materials group led by Prof. Wang Liping at the Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering of the Chinese Academy of Sciences , has successfully prepared ultrathin metal-organic framework nanosheets via surfactant-assisted bottom-up method.

Phys.org Shared .

New tuberous species of begonia found in southern YunnanBegonia comprises the sixth-largest genus of angiosperms and the number of accepted species of Begonia currently reaches more than 1,991 species.

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Elephants found to have the highest volume of daily water loss ever recorded in a land animalA team of researchers from Duke University, the University of the Witwatersrand and Hunter College has found that elephants have the highest volume of daily water loss ever recorded in a land animal.

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China's space ambitions: robot on Mars, a human on the moonChina's landing of its third probe on the moon is part of an increasingly ambitious space program that has a robot rover en route to Mars, is developing a reusable space plane and is planning to put humans back on the lunar surface.

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Sediment cores from Dogger Littoral suggest Dogger Island survived ancient tsunamiA team of researchers affiliated with several institutions in the U.K. has found evidence that suggests the ancient Dogger Island survived a tsunami approximately 8,150 years ago.

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How lessons from bees, leaves and our own blood may help us save civilizationOnce upon a time, everything theoretically could be managed with neatly functioning human inventions: wars could be won, diseases cured, weather predicted, crops improved.

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Why there's a lot more to love about jacarandas than just their purple flowersEvery spring, streets across Australia turn purple with the delicate, falling flowers of jacarandas. This year, they'll likely be flowering over Christmas.

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In the far future, stellar flybys will completely dismantle the solar systemThe study is titled "The Great Inequality and the Dynamical Disintegration of the Outer solar system." The lead author is Jon Zink, a graduate student in UCLA's Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics.

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Scientists discover new way to measure turbulence of large planets and exoplanetsThe swirls, eddies, and wavy bands of Jupiter and Saturn may remind us of a soothing, starry, starry night—but they reveal these two gas giants to be stormy, turbulent places.

Phys.org Shared .

Researchers develop new electrode structure for all-solid-state secondary batterySouth Korean researchers have developed a new type of electrode structure for all-solid-state secondary batteries.

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China spacecraft collects moon samples to take back to EarthA Chinese spacecraft took samples of the moon's surface Wednesday as part of a mission to bring lunar rocks back to Earth for the first time since the 1970s, the government said, adding to a string of successes for Beijing's increasingly ambitious space program.

Phys.org Shared .

Second cyclone in a week threatens Sri Lanka, IndiaSri Lanka and southern India battened down the hatches for the second time in a week on Wednesday ahead of the scheduled arrival of another cyclone from the Bay of Bengal.

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The Future of Mars ExplorationDreier and Billings will also discuss the "post-Perseverance" future in which space agencies and private companies may pursue major shifts in Mars exploration strategies, and how those plans could forever change our understanding of-and relationship with-the Red Planet.

Scientific American Shared .

A COVID-19 time capsule captures pandemic moments for future researchersSocial scientists chose photos, charts and even a tweet to help future researchers understand the pandemic.

Science News Shared .

Scientists find 81-year-old snapper, the world's oldest tropical reef fishIt saw the Beatles take over the world, and it was collected in a fisheries survey after Nirvana came and went.

The Independent Shared .

Elon Musk and SpaceX want to get humans to Mars in just six yearsELON Musk has confidently claimed that his SpaceX will be able to get humans to Mars by 2026.

Express Shared .

The U.S. Has Embraced Immigrant Tech Entrepreneurs. Now It's Europe's TurnScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

Two Global Efforts Try to Trace the Origin of the Covid VirusBoth teams want to know when—or how often—the virus passed from animals to people. But the trail may have gone cold, and the search has gotten political.

Wired UK Shared .

NASA images shows mysterious dark matter 'hairs' sprouting from EarthNASA has released an intriguing image showing Earth sprouting 'dark matter hairs' in another baffling twist to the elusive subject.

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On Climate, Biden Must Do More than Undo Trump's DamageScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

U.K. Approves Pfizer Coronavirus Vaccine, a First in the WestThe emergency approval, ahead of the United States and the European Union, clears the way for Britain to begin mass inoculations.

The New York Times Shared .

This prehistoric woman from Peru hunted big gameWomen in the Americas speared large prey as early as 9,000 years ago, new archaeological evidence suggests.

Science News For Students Shared .

Elon Musk confirms he did have covid after tweeting that tests were ‘extremely bogus'I've already had COVID', Musk said at the Axel Springer Award ceremony.

The Independent Shared .

December's Geminid meteor shower comes from the asteroid PhaethonMost meteor showers arise from comets, but the robust Geminid shower comes from an asteroid, Phaethon, which scientists are still trying to figure out.

Science News Shared .

Asteroid skimmed past Earth on Friday 13th but wasn't spotted until next dayAsteroid 2020 VT4 passed by the Earth as close as the International Space Station.

The Independent Shared .

No country 'immune' to COVID-19 economic shock, but Asian nations will bounce back fasterGlobal GDP will drop three percent below pre-pandemic estimates by the end of 2021, with many Western nations seeing "deeper and longer-lasting" effects compared to China and other Asian economies, a study suggests.

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Yellowstone volcano: If supervolcano erupted it could kill 90,000 'immediately'A YELLOWSTONE supervolcano eruption could kill up to 90,000 people in an instant and create a thick ash cloud which would plunge the plant into a 'nuclear winter'.

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World's most-complete triceratops skeleton to go on display in Melbourne in 2021The 67-million-year-old fossil now being dug from rock on private land in the United States is the most complete and finely preserved triceratops ever found, comprising hundreds of bones.

ABC Science News Shared .

China's 'space dream': A Long March to the Moon and beyondChina's landing this week of a probe on the Moon—the first attempt by any nation to retrieve lunar samples in four just how far the country has come in achieving its space dream.

Phys.org Shared .

'Don't leave trash in the desert': Utah monolith removal explainedThe mystery of how a metal monolith appeared in the Utah desert remains, but the riddle of its removal seems to have been solved—and sadly, has nothing to do with aliens.

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Lab developing device to help Earth dodge asteroidsIn a corner of the campus at Riga Technical University, a team of scientists is working on technology that could one day stop asteroids from smashing into Earth.

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New Zealand symbolically declares climate emergencyJoining more than 30 countries, New Zealand on Wednesday took the symbolic step of declaring a climate emergency.

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Wildlife advocates sue US agency to protect Canada lynxWildlife advocates sued the federal government Tuesday in a bid to force officials to do more to conserve Canada lynx, a snow-loving cat that has struggled to survive in parts of the U.S. West.

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Keeping California a powerhouse of almond productionA favorite healthy snack, almonds are a staple on grocery store shelves worldwide. More than 80% of these almonds are grown in California.

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After 100 years, Cornell University plant pathologists revisit fire blight hypothesisHistorically credited as being the first bacterium ever characterized as a plant pathogen, fire blight is a bacterial disease that leads to significant losses of pear and apple.

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Waking the dead in a Dickensian workhouseArchaeologists are digging up the cemetery behind the Strand Union workhouse in Camden - and the remains reveal some grim secrets about the way Victorian society viewed the poor.

The Independent Shared .

Coronavirus live news: UK to get vaccine from next week; England enters tier system after lockdownPfizer / BioNTech vaccine approved in UK; New tier system replaces lockdown; US reported over 100,000 cases every day in November.

The Guardian Shared .

Terrawatch: what does the inside of a volcano look like?Detailed analysis of a buried extinct volcano in the Faroe-Shetland Basin reveals some surprises.

The Guardian Shared .

Deep Blue Notes: episode twoWildlife recordist Chris Watson and spatial audio sound artist Prof Tony Myatt continue on their three-part journey to the Sea of Cortez fishing for the song of the blue whale.

The Guardian Shared .

Keeping California a powerhouse of almond productionResearch shows nitrogen efficiency and productivity not a tradeoff.

EurekAlert! Shared .

Building resiliency in children as the COVID-19 pandemic continues through the holidaysA new survey by Nationwide Children's Hospital found two-thirds of parents worry the effects of the pandemic on their children's mental health will be more challenging to recover from the longer it continues.

EurekAlert! Shared .

Octapharma presents results of study on Octagam 10% for severe COVID-19 patients at ASHClinical research presented by Octapharma USA at the 62nd American Society of Hematology. Annual Meeting and Exposition will highlight the investigational use of high-dose Octagam 10% for the most severe COVID-19 patients.

EurekAlert! Shared .

ETRI, DGIST develop new electrode structure for all-solid-state secondary batteryA joint research team from Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute and Daegu Gyeongbuk Institute of Science and Technology announced that it had designed a new electrode structure for all-solid-state secondary batteries after identifying the mechanism of facile lithium-ion diffusion between active materials.

EurekAlert! Shared .

Protein Biology Takes a Giant Leap Into the FutureThe genome has instructions for creating and maintaining an organism, but most biological functions involve their translated form - proteins.

LabRoots Shared .

What can Biden do on climate change if Republicans keep Senate majority?President-elect Joe Biden has said he plans to address climate change as soon as he takes office.

CBS News Shared .

55 Creepy Pictures And The Eerie Stories Behind ThemFrom evil science experiments to serial killers to the paranormal, see history's creepiest photos — and learn their disturbing backstories.

All That's Interesting Shared .

Q&A: What Joe Biden can do to "reverse the trajectory" of the U.S. on climate changeIf President-elect Joe Biden has his way, the tide is about to turn on climate policy.

CBS News Shared .

China just landed the Chang'e 5 spacecraft on the Moon. Why is this a big deal?The Chang'e 5 mission is the first to attempt to bring a stash of moon rocks back to Earth in more than 40 years.

ABC Science News Shared .

Iconic Arecibo Observatory radio telescope collapses after cable brokeMany scientists and Puerto Ricans mourned the news, with some tearing up during interviews. Deborah Martorell, a meteorologist in Puerto Rico, tweeted early Tuesday: "Friends, it is with deep regret to inform you that the Arecibo Observatory platform has just collapsed."

CBS News Shared .

Cancer cells 'remove blindfold' to spreadCancer cells spread by switching on and off abilities to sense their surroundings, move, hide and grow new tumors, a new study has found.

Phys.org Shared .

Here's who should get COVID-19 vaccines first, per CDC advisersWith an initial 40 million doses of the vaccines, enough for 20 million people, anticipated by year-end, health officials are setting priorities.

Science News Shared .

Bezos' Blue Origin taps former Pentagon, NASA officials for new advisory boardBlue Origin said on Tuesday it formed a new advisory board of former Pentagon and NASA officials, as billionaire Jeff Bezos' space company vies for lucrative government contracts and readies its first orbital rocket for debut next year.

Reuters Shared .

Shorter Reinforcement Delays Make Neurofeedback More EffectiveResearchers at Russias Higher School of Economics have found that reducing delay in neurofeedback significantly increases training efficie - Neuroscience.

LabRoots Shared .

Arecibo Observatory telescope, a Puerto Rico landmark, collapses after damageAfter sustaining severe damage from a broken cable, the famed Arecibo Observatory telescope in Puerto Rico has collapsed.

CBS News Shared .

That's Not A Spider: It's a SNAKE!This episode is sponsored by Awesome Socks Club, a sock subscription for charity. Go to to sign up between now and December 11th to get a new pair of fun socks each month in 2021.

Sci Show Shared .

Researchers Develop Hydrogen and Oxygen Harvesting System for Use on MarsA team of scientists at Washington University in St. Louis has demonstrated an approach to produce ultrapure hydrogen and oxygen from liquid Martian brines at minus 36 degrees Celsius.

Sci News Shared .

Meteor shower 2020: When are the Geminids? 'One of the best and most reliable showers'Like clockwork, the meteors burst out into the night sky each year in December. But the shower is most intense on one night in particular when more than 100 meteors an hour can be seen.

Express Shared .

CBD Does Not Effect Driving Ability, THC Wears Off in 4 HoursResearchers from the Lambert Initiative at the University of Sydney, have found that cannabidiol, a medically active compound found in cannabis, does not a - Cannabis Sciences.

LabRoots Shared .

Virus May Have Arrived in U.S. in December, but Didn't Spread Until LaterBlood samples collected in mid-December indicate possible infections more than a month before the known first case of Covid-19, but do not show community transmission.

The New York Times Shared .

China readies hypersonic ‘sodramjet' engine ‘able to reach anywhere on Earth in two hours'CHINA has devised a revolutionary hypersonic jet engine it claims could be capable of flying at Mach 16.

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New method sees fibers in 3-D, uses it to estimate conductivityAs a vehicle travels through space at hypersonic speeds, the gases surrounding it generate heat at dangerous temperatures for the pilot and instrumentation inside.

Phys.org Shared .

Georgina Mace, Who Shaped List of Endangered Species, Dies at 67She rewrote the global Red List, which describes which species are in trouble, and warned that the world must restore its ecological balance or pay a steep price.

The New York Times Shared .

Molecule that regulates muscle adaptation to exercise is discoveredThe onset of any physical exercise program causes muscle pain that can hinder movements as simple as getting up from a sofa.

Phys.org Shared .

Flood Risks to Low-Income Homes to Triple by 2050Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

Geoscientists use zircon to trace origin of Earth's continentsGeoscientists have long known that some parts of the continents formed in the Earth's deep past, but the speed in which land rose above global seas—and the exact shapes that land masses formed—have so far eluded experts.

Phys.org Shared .

The Arecibo Telescope in Puerto Rico CollapsesAstronomers and residents of Puerto Rico mourned as an eye on the cosmos shuttered unexpectedly on Tuesday morning.

The New York Times Shared .

Graphene: The building block for sustainable citiesInnovation in advanced materials offers the disruptive potential to transform the way we build our future cities—and make them greener and smarter.

Phys.org Shared .

Cretaceous Titanosaur Suffered from Blood Parasites and Severe Bone InflammationA giant sauropod dinosaur that lived 85.2 million years ago in what is now Brazil had an aggressive case of osteomyelitis in its leg and soft-bodied parasitical microorganisms in its vascular canals.

Sci News Shared .

How to spot winning sperm: Examine their racing stripesMillions of sperm enter the race to fertilize, but only one wins the sprint to the egg.

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NASA news: Hubble captures ‘monster black hole' 13 million light years awayNASA has reexamined an iconic Hubble Space Telescope image of a distant galaxy, at the centre of which lurks a supermassive black hole.

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Breakthrough Drug Reduces Inflammation and Pain in ArthritisResearchers from the Universities of Oxford and Birmingham in the UK have found reduce inflammation and pain scores in patients - Drug Discovery And Development.

LabRoots Shared .

Stimulus relief funds increase social distancing to stop spread of COVID-19As case rates of COVID-19 reach new heights across the nation, many states and cities are tightening stay-at-home restrictions to stop the spread.

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Study suggests metabolism influences parasite's resistance to drugsNew insight on how a parasite can resist current therapies has been published today in the open-access eLife journal.

Phys.org Shared .

Arecibo Observatory telescope collapses in Puerto Rico months after cables snapThe huge, already damaged Arecibo Observatory, famed for its key role in scientific discoveries as well as appearances in Hollywood films like GoldenEye, completely collapses after its 900-ton receiver platform falls onto the reflector dish below.

ABC Science News Shared .

3,000-Year-Old Gold Bead Unearthed in IsraelA team of professional and amateur archaeologists from the Temple Mount Sifting Project has found a tiny gold bead from the First Temple period in Jerusalem, Israel.

Sci News Shared .

Parler, the 'free speech' Twitter clone, surged in Australia after US electionIn the days after the US election, the relatively unknown app rocketed through the rankings on Australia's Apple and Google app stores.

ABC Science News Shared .

Asteroid news: NASA announces 'potentially hazardous' 820ft space rock flyby this weekASTEROID trackers at NASA have revealed giant space rock 2020 WD5 is scheduled to safely make an 'Earth close approach' this Thursday.

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The Guardian view on a new test for cancer: grounds for optimismEditorial: Early diagnosis is essential if survival rates are to improve, and the announcement of a trial starting next year is a promising sign.

The Guardian Shared .

Massive Puerto Rico telescope featured in James Bond movie collapsesReuters) - A massive radio telescope at Puerto Rico's Arecibo Observatory - one of the world's largest - collapsed on Tuesday after sustaining severe damage since August, officials said, following 57 years of astronomical discoveries.

Reuters Shared .

China says spacecraft successfully lands on moon for historic sample collectionIf successful, the Chang'e 5 mission will make China only the third nation to bring moon rocks back to Earth.

CBS News Shared .

How politics drive our personal relationshipsThe 2020 presidential election again laid bare the divisions that separate people in the United States.

Phys.org Shared .

Octogenarian snapper found in WA becomes oldest tropical reef fish by two decadesAn 81-year-old midnight snapper caught off the coast of Western Australia has taken the title of the oldest tropical reef fish recorded anywhere in the world.

Phys.org Shared .

Chinese probe lands on Moon to collect lunar samplesA Chinese probe sent to the Moon to bring back the first lunar samples in four decades successfully landed on Tuesday, Beijing's space agency said.

Phys.org Shared .

We've mapped a million previously undiscovered galaxies beyond the Milky Way. Take the virtual tour here.Astronomers have mapped about a million previously undiscovered galaxies beyond the Milky Way, in the most detailed survey of the southern sky ever carried out using radio waves.

Phys.org Shared .

'Sabre-toothed tiger' skeleton up for auctionA nearly 40-million-year-old skeleton belonging to what is popularly known as a sabre-toothed tiger is going under the hammer next week in Geneva a year after its discovery on a US ranch.

Phys.org Shared .

Genomics, gene-editing and the Blue RevolutionAquaculture—the farming of fish and shellfish, is the world's fastest growing primary industry. It provides a healthy source of protein, oil and minerals for our rapidy expanding human population.

Phys.org Shared .

Researchers find that building footbridges positively affects rural economies in flood-prone areasMany residents of flood-prone areas of rural Nicaragua face uncertain economic futures each season. In a new paper, EGC faculty affiliate Kevin Donovan and co-author Wyatt Brooks of Arizona State University examine the role of footbridges in providing rural households reliable access to larger and higher-paying urban labor markets.

Phys.org Shared .

During the coronavirus pandemic, radio has proven to be the medium of referenceRadio has always proved to be a medium that adapts easily to crisis situations. Throughout history, at times of major natural disasters and health emergencies, radio has played a leading role thanks to the fact that is the most universal, simplest and most accessible of media.

Phys.org Shared .

Plants on aspirinWhen pathogens enter a plant, infected cells set off an alarm before they die. They discharge methylsalicylic acid, which is later transformed into salicylic acid, triggering an immune response.

Phys.org Shared .

Climate change warms groundwater in BavariaGroundwater reservoirs in Bavaria have warmed considerably over the past few decades. A new study by researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg compares temperatures at 35 measuring stations, taken at different depths, with data from the 1990s.

Phys.org Shared .

Pronouns matter—pronoun use conveys inclusivityIn her doctoral dissertation, Laura Hekanaho investigates attitudes towards English third person singular pronouns. The use of pronouns is very politicized.

Phys.org Shared .

Breaking the rules of chemistry unlocks new reactionScientists have broken the rules of enzyme engineering to unlock a new method for creating chemical reactions that could unlock a wide range of new applications—from creating new drugs to food production.

Phys.org Shared .

Early human landscape modifications discovered in AmazoniaIn 2002 Professor Alceu Ranzi and Prof. Martti Parssinen decided to form an international research team to study large geometric earthworks, called geoglyphs, in the Brazilian state of Acre in Southwestern Amazonia.

Phys.org Shared .

Molecular 'barcode' helps decide which sperm will reach an eggA protein called CatSper1 may act as a molecular 'barcode' that helps determine which sperm cells will make it to an egg and which are eliminated along the way.

Phys.org Shared .

Scientists warn of the social and environmental risks tied to the energy transitionTo meet the most ambitious 1.5º C climate goal requires a rapid phase-out of fossil fuels and mass use of renewables.

Phys.org Shared .

DeepMind's AI Makes Gigantic Leap in Solving Protein StructuresScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

Cost of planting, protecting trees to fight climate change could jumpPlanting trees and preventing deforestation are considered key climate change mitigation strategies, but a new analysis finds the cost of preserving and planting trees to hit certain global emissions reductions targets could accelerate quickly.

Phys.org Shared .

Watching the Arctic thaw in fast-forwardThe Arctic is warming more quickly than almost any other region on Earth as a result of climate change.

Phys.org Shared .

SLC25A51 regulates the transport of the coenzyme NAD into the mitochondriaFor their growth, cells need various nutrients and vitamins. So-called solute carriers , proteins that can transport such substances across the boundaries of cellular membranes, play a central role in metabolism.

Phys.org Shared .

Mathematician suggests new approach to cooperative gameA mathematician from RUDN University developed a matrix representation of set functions. This approach is vivid and easy to check, and it makes the calculations easier.

Phys.org Shared .

Danish researchers develop budget optical ammonia sensorIn collaboration with the Technical University of Denmark , the Department of Engineering at Aarhus University has developed photonic sensor technology that can pave the way for a portable, reliable and, above all, inexpensive device for detecting ammonia and other gases in agriculture.

Phys.org Shared .

A semiconductor chip detects antigen concentrations at 1 parts per quadrillion molar massAssociate Professor Kazuhiro Takahashi and Assistant Professor Yong-Joon Choi of the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering at Toyohashi University of Technology have developed a chip that can sense antigens at one part per quadrillion molar mass.

Phys.org Shared .

Curtin collision models impact the future of energyA new Curtin University-created database of electron-molecule reactions is a major step forward in making nuclear fusion power a reality, by allowing researchers to accurately model plasmas containing molecular hydrogen.

Phys.org Shared .

Scientists uncover the mysterious origin of canal grass in PanamaUrban legends about the origins of canal grass in Panama abound, but the Smithsonian has new evidence that puts the question to rest.

Phys.org Shared .

The Benefits of Exercise on Adipokine Levels for Post-Menopausal WomenThe benefits of a healthy lifestyle don't just stop when you get older. Being active has been shown to improve post-menopausal life for women, be it - Cardiology.

LabRoots Shared .

SpaceX launch: Elon Musk says first 9 mile Starship flight this weekSPACEX could conduct its first high-altitude test of its Starship rocket, the space company's CEO Elon Musk has announced.

Express Shared .

Super-Earth Proxima c Has Earth-Like Stellar Environment, Study SuggestsIn a new study published in the Astrophysical Journal Letters, astronomers investigated the effects the activity of the red dwarf star Proxima Centauri might have on the atmosphere of one of its planets, Proxima c.

Sci News Shared .

China is about to collect the first moon rocks since the 1970sThe robotic Chang'e-5 mission, which landed on an unexplored region of the moon December 1, aims to gather samples and return them to Earth.

Science News Shared .

China's Chang'e 5 mission lands on Moon to retrieve lunar samplesChina's Chang'e 5 robot probe lands on the Moon and prepares to begin collecting rock sample, in the latest move in a program which could end up with a Chinese astronaut walking on the lunar surface.

ABC Science News Shared .

China's Chang'e 5 Lands on Moon to Collect Fresh SamplesScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

New model predicts that larger fish suffer respiratory distress soonerLarge fish develop respiratory distress more quickly in warm water than smaller species, according to a new study involving researchers at Radboud University in collaboration with international researchers from McGill University and the University of Montana.

Phys.org Shared .

When businesses behave badlyOn a fateful April night ten years ago, the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded—taking the lives of 11 crew members and triggering the largest marine oil spill in history.

Phys.org Shared .

US: mountain pine tree that feeds grizzlies is threatenedClimate change, voracious beetles and disease are imperiling the long-term survival of a high-elevation pine tree that's a key source of food for some grizzly bears and found across the U.S. West, U.S, officials said Tuesday.

Phys.org Shared .

Decontaminating almonds and nuts with compressed carbon dioxideHardly a day goes by without manufacturers recalling food tainted by impurities. Even dry foods, generally thought to be safe because they lack the water pathogens needed to thrive, are often pulled from store shelves.

Phys.org Shared .

This Zero-Waste Gift Should Be EverywhereAs part of THE GREAT GIFT EXCHANGE, AsapSCIENCE are transported to a magical "Wrapshop" to wrap a charitable gift for blind creator Molly Burke.

Asap Science Shared .

Scientists solve big limitation of stratospheric balloon payloadsIn Review of Scientific Instruments, Alan J. Kogut, of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, and colleagues found a way to solve a widely recognized limitation of stratospheric balloon payloads, which fly at altitudes of 130,000 feet above 99% of the atmosphere.

Phys.org Shared .

CRISPR tagging improves accuracy of model cells grown from stem cellsA team of biomedical engineers at Duke University has created a new way to turn stem cells into a desired cell type by mastering the language of gene regulatory networks.

Phys.org Shared .

Watch immune cells dig tunnels in tissuesWhite blood cells called cytotoxic T lymphocytes dig tunnels in tissues, potentially allowing other CTLs to quickly reach infected cells and tumor cells, researchers report December 1st in Biophysical Journal.

Phys.org Shared .

Suburbs are becoming increasingly diverseHistorically, suburbs have been considered as places which are less diverse than cities, particularly with regard to their racial and social class composition.

Phys.org Shared .

Deciphering the energetic code of cells for better anticancer therapiesThe CNRS, INSERM, and Aix-Marseille University scientists at the Centre d'Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy, in association with colleagues from the University of California San Francisco and the Marseille Public University Hospital System , with support from Canceropôle d'Azur, have reported a procedure that may help personalize anticancer...

Phys.org Shared .

How the insect got its wings: Scientists tell the taleIt sounds like a "Just So Story"—"How the Insect Got its Wings"—but it's really a mystery that has puzzled biologists for over a century.

Phys.org Shared .

Take Racism Out of Medical AlgorithmsScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

Learning at your own pace with AIWhen Singapore emerged from a two-month long COVID-19-imposed Circuit Breaker , AI Singapore, a national Artificial Intelligence program set up by the National Research Foundation to anchor deep national capabilities in AI, launched the AI vs COVID-19 Ideation Challenge.

Phys.org Shared .

How smart cities can serve citizensAlthough cities and urban areas only make up a small proportion of the world's land mass, they are home to more than half the global population and that number is going to keep rising.

Phys.org Shared .

Surprising trove of sorghum diversity discovered in Australia—but it's disappearing fastNew research published in the journal Diversity and Distributions used cutting-edge technology to show that wild cousins of sorghum, the fifth-most important cereal crop globally, are most concentrated in Australia, despite having been domesticated in Africa.

Phys.org Shared .

Scientists Identify Gene Responsible for Aging of Human CellsA gene called GATA6 regulates aging of human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells , according to new research from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Sci News Shared .

The Arecibo Radio Telescope's Massive Platform Has CollapsedScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

China successfully lands spacecraft on moon to retrieve lunar rocks: state mediaChina successfully landed a spacecraft on the moon's surface on Tuesday in a historic mission to retrieve lunar surface samples, Chinese state media reported.

Reuters Shared .

Plasma treatment reduces migration of plasticizers from blood bagsMedical products such as blood bags and tubing are often made from soft PVC, a plastic that contains phthalate plasticizers, which are suspected to be harmful to human health.

Phys.org Shared .

Researchers identify new process to produce ammonia with a much smaller carbon footprintAmmonia is the second most commonly produced chemical in the world and an important component of most fertilizers, but current industrial processes to make ammonia produce several millions of tons of carbon dioxide-a potent greenhouse gas-each year.

Phys.org Shared .

China Moon landing: Chang'e 5 touches down on the Moon to collect rock for Earth returnCHINA'S Chang'e 5 probe has landed on the Moon, China's National Space Administration has confirmed.

Express Shared .

Air pollution spikes linked to lower test scores for Salt Lake County third gradersFine particulate matter , the tiny particles responsible for hazy air pollution, are detrimental to children's health even inside the classroom.

Phys.org Shared .

What will the climate be like when Earth's next supercontinent forms?Long ago, all the continents were crammed together into one large land mass called Pangea.

Phys.org Shared .

Detection of cancer from exhaled breathThe air we exhale contains information that can assist with the diagnosis of disease. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Project Hub for Microelectronic and Optical Systems for Biomedicine MEOS are now developing solutions designed to enable the analysis of breath gas for this purpose.

Phys.org Shared .

Virus-like probes could help make rapid COVID-19 testing more accurate, reliableNanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have developed new and improved probes, known as positive controls, that could make it easier to validate rapid, point-of-care diagnostic tests for COVID-19 across the globe.

Phys.org Shared .

Study spotlights Black social reformer, parks and rec pioneer, on Chicago's South SideA new paper shines a spotlight on a Black social reformer and racial justice advocate whose efforts to serve the poor on the South Side of Chicago helped spark the modern parks and recreation movement.

Phys.org Shared .

The missing middle: Puberty is a critical time at school, so why aren't we investing in it more?The middle years of school are defined as being from 8-14 years of age. These were often described as a latent or quiet phase of development.

Phys.org Shared .

Australian telescope creates a new atlas of the universeThe Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder , developed and operated by Australia's national science agency, CSIRO, mapped approximately three million galaxies in just 300 hours.

Phys.org Shared .

Study of river otters near oilsands operations shows reduced baculum strengthA team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Canada has found evidence that suggests river otters living near oil sands operations in Alberta, Canada, have reduced baculum strength.

Phys.org Shared .

Pumping a nanoparticle to lase at low powerLasers are used in a range of everyday devices, harnessing the power of light molecules, photons, - lined up to form highly concentrated beams of light—to perform now common tasks such as scanning barcodes and removing tattoos.

Phys.org Shared .

Chemical memory in plants affects chances of offspring survivalResearchers at the University of Warwick have uncovered the mechanism that allows plants to pass on their 'memories' to offspring, which results in growth and developmental defects.

Phys.org Shared .

Astronomy breakthrough: 'Many civilisations out there' as search for alien life ramps upASTRONOMERS have ramped-up the search for extraterrestrial life, with one astrobiologist expressing his concern that we are missing many of the civilisations that exist in outer space.

Express Shared .

New research reveals 'megatrends' that will affect forests in the next decadeA group of experts from academic, governmental and international organizations have identified five large-scale 'megatrends' affecting forests and forest communities, published today in Nature Plants.

Phys.org Shared .

Image: Rad dishes in spaceNASA astronaut Kate Rubins poses next to a thriving radish crop growing inside the Advanced Plant Habitat in the International Space Station.

Phys.org Shared .

Researchers develop customized targeting of bacteria using lysinsResearchers from the Antimicrobial Resistance. Interdisciplinary Research Group at Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology , MIT's research enterprise in Singapore, have developed a method to produce customisable engineered lysins that can be used to selectively kill bacteria of interest while leaving others unharmed.

Phys.org Shared .

Researchers peer deep inside tissue with new high-resolution techniquesOne of the challenges in optical imaging is to visualize the inside of tissue in high resolution.

Phys.org Shared .

Asteroid 2020 SO images reveal mystery object is likely a piece of NASA rocketTHE mysterious object 2020 SO flew by Earth in the early hours of this morning, and scientists may finally know what it is.

Express Shared .

A new lesson about phase transitions and criticalityNUS physicists have discovered a theoretical behavior known as the "critical skin effect" influencing how changes between different phases of matter occur.

Phys.org Shared .

Making mechanical skinSoft, stretchable materials that are also electrically conductive are hard to come by. It's even harder to create a circuit that withstands damage, going as far as to heal itself.

Phys.org Shared .

Tweaking carotenoid genes helps tomatoes bring their A-gameCooked, fresh, sun-dried, or juiced, whichever way you prefer them, tomatoes are arguably one of the most versatile fruits on the planet—and yes, despite mainly being used in savory dishes, tomatoes really are a fruit.

Phys.org Shared .

A possible way to measure ancient rate of cosmic ray strikes using 'paleo-detectors'An international team of researchers has proposed a way to indirectly measure the rate of cosmic rays striking the Earth over millions of years.

Phys.org Shared .

Viruses Can Help Us as Well as Harm UsScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

China Moon landing declared successCHINA'S Moon lander Chang'e 5 has landed on the Moon, China's space agency has confirmed.

Express Shared .

Are We Real? And Other Questions of PhysicsScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

Thermonuclear type-I X-ray bursts detected from MAXI J1807+132An international team of astronomers has investigated an X-ray binary system known as MAXI J1807+132, using the NICER instrument aboard the International Space Station.

Phys.org Shared .

Our Immigration Policy Has Done Terrible Damage to KidsScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

Scar-Free Healing Starts With Mobilizing the Immune SystemThanks to a new hydrogel biomaterial developed by researchers at Duke University, we are one step closer to the holy grail of scar-free wound healing.

LabRoots Shared .

Breathing New Life Into COVID DiagnosticsWidespread diagnostic testing capacities are an absolutely critical tool for countries battling the pandemic. For now, most COVID diagnostics rely on routi - Clinical And Molecular Dx.

LabRoots Shared .

Giant Arecibo radio telescope collapses in Puerto RicoScientists and Puerto Ricans mourn loss of historic observatory that had been set to close after damage in August.

The Guardian Shared .

"Killer" electrons associated with the pulsating auroraIn a collaboration between scientists in Japan and the United States, a new study has been published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters explaining the physics behind the phenomenon of the pulsating aurora.

LabRoots Shared .

Archaeologists discover origins of curvy Venus statues carved during time of starvationARCHAEOLOGISTS are uncovering more truths about one of the earliest examples of crafted art.

Express Shared .

The price tag of prostate cancer treatmentNew research published in The Journal of Urology from the Official Journal of the American Urological Association reports on the price tag associated with prostate cancer in men.

LabRoots Shared .

Vegetation in poor countries isn't holding up as well to climate change as vegetation in rich countriesNew research from scientists at the University of Copenhagens Department of Geosciences and Natural Resources Management has arrived at troubling conc - Earth And The Environment.

LabRoots Shared .

Top 10 Emerging Technologies of 2020Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

Next step in simulating the universeComputer simulations have struggled to capture the impact of elusive particles called neutrinos on the formation and growth of the large-scale structure of the universe.

Phys.org Shared .

Examining climate effects of regional nuclear exchangeA team of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researchers has found that the global climatic consequences of a regional nuclear weapons exchange could range from a minimal impact to more significant cooling lasting years.

Phys.org Shared .

Transportation of water into the deep Earth by Al-phase DResearchers at Ehime University have recently measured the propagation speed of ultrasonic waves in an aluminum-rich hydrous mineral called Al-phase D at pressure conditions relevant to the Earth's deep mantle.

Phys.org Shared .

Ultrasensitive transistor for herbicide detection in waterA new polymer-based, solid-state transistor can more sensitively detect a weed killer in drinking water than existing hydrogel-based fluorescence sensor chips.

Phys.org Shared .

Stickleback study reveals 'parallel' evolutionAnimal species in different parts of the world can evolve in "parallel" in response to similar conditions, according to a new study of fish.

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