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Beyond Order by Jordan Peterson reviewThere is too much messianic passion and not enough enlightening psychology in Peterson's follow-up to the bestselling 12 Rules for Life.

The Guardian Shared .

How do we track and measure new variants of coronavirus?Behind the numbers: The UK's gene sequencing labs are at the forefront of global efforts to trace and identify every single case.

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How early humans' quest for food stoked the flames of evolutionA love of complex smells and flavours gave our ancestors an edge and stopped hangovers.

The Guardian Shared .

University of Queensland student developing AI-assisted robotic prostheticUniversity of Queensland student Nat Marshall is developing robotic prosthetics that will learn how to become even better for their users over time.

ABC Science News Shared .

Drop in willingness to get COVID-19 vaccine attributed to lack of exposure to 'how bad it really is', researcher saysAustralia's success at suppressing the COVID-19 pandemic could be behind a decline in people's willingness to be vaccinated against the virus, according to a university researcher.

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Earth's Hot Neighbor Is the Stuff of Astronomers' DreamsThis image by RenderArea is an artistic impression of the surface of a newly discovered, scorching hot, rocky, super-Earth called Gliese 486b - Space.

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Scientists rejoice over discovery of native wetland fish thought to be extinctA colony of native wetland fish declared extinct 20 years ago has been found — and scientists are determined to stop the species from slipping through their fingers again.

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Kathleen Folbigg: how genetics could lead to a pardon for 'Australia's worst female serial killer'She has always maintained her four children died of natural causes. Now 90 scientists argue she may be right.

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Green Tea Extract Can Affect Facial Development in Kids With Down SyndromeIndividuals with Down syndrome often have certain facial features. New research has suggested that green tea supplements could reduce the likelihood of this characteristic appearance when taken by children with Down syndrome throughout their first three years of life if taken in the right dose.

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Episode 417 with Sarah Dorfman!  Probably ScienceComedian and analytics consultant Sarah Dorfman joins Andy and Matt to discuss asking a ton of whys, magnetic pole flips and killing neanderthals, trees showing pole flips, India's lake of skeletons, the first photograph ever, the hidden message in Perseverance's parachute, AI conquering '80s video games, and little Jack Black in an ad for Pitfall.

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The epic battle with cancer's 'Death Star'Forty years after the mutant genes that cause the deadliest cancers were discovered, drugs that target them could be approved.

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Astronomers Find Tectonic Activity on ExoplanetFor the first time, researchers from the University of Bern in Switzerland have found evidence of tectonic activity on a planet outside of our Solar System - Space.

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In Obesity Research, Fatphobia Is Always the X FactorScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Coronavirus live news: UK still not out of the woods, expert says; Dalai Lama gets first Covid vaccine doseContradictory death figures in Russia; WHO warns against relaxing guard due to vaccines.

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The ‘Lamborghini' of Chariots Was Just Unearthed Near PompeiiMost of the vehicles uncovered so far have been akin to modern-day station wagons. This one's a straight-up sports car.

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50, 100 and 150 Years Ago: March 2021Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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The Biden Administration Weighs the Social Cost of CarbonA new White House policy tries to put a dollar value on the future harm of greenhouse gas emissions.

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You've been vaccinated  the CDC is finalizing guidance on what's safe for you to doIt's likely to be safe for those who have received the COVID-19 vaccine to have small gatherings with others who are vaccinated.

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From Pfizer to Moderna: who's making billions from Covid-19 vaccines?The companies in line for the biggest windfalls - and the shareholders who have already made fortunes.

The Guardian Shared .

Archaeology news: Discovery of Galilee boat from Jesus' time proves Bible accurateARCHAEOLOGICAL discoveries from the Biblical Sea of Galilee have been hailed as definitive proof of the Bible's historical reliability.

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Study marks major milestone for Louisiana coastal planA nearly $2 billion plan to divert water and sediment from the Mississippi River to rebuild land in southeastern the cornerstone of the state's efforts to protect its rapidly eroding coast—has passed a major milestone with the publication of the long-awaited Army Corps of Engineers environmental impact study.

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Flamingos poisoned by illegal lead pellets in Greek lagoonOn a country road that the locals have dubbed 'Flamingo Street' Stavros Kalpakis walks alongside the tall reeds of Agios Mamas, a small northern Greek lagoon, peering through binoculars.

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With unfair police treatment, the tragedy is not limited to the incident itselfNew research using a nationally representative sample of more than 12,000 participants shows the collateral consequences victims are likely to confront following unfair treatment by police.

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New 'split-drive' system puts scientists in the driver seatPowerful new genetic engineering methods have given scientists the potential to revolutionize several sectors of global urgency.

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Deeper understanding of host-dependent long-distance movement of viruses in plantsSome plant viruses systemically infect plants and cause huge losses in yield though our understanding of how systemic infections occur is largely unknown.

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Physics camp has proven benefits for high school girlsEven a small effort up front can boost the abilities and confidence of girls as they anticipate taking challenging science courses.

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NASA's new Mars rover hits dusty red road, 1st trip 21 feetNASA's newest Mars rover hit the dusty red road this week, putting 21 feet on the odometer in its first test drive.

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From the Vault: Overconfidence, Part 2What is overconfidence? We tend to know it when we see it, but the concept is increasingly hard to nail down the more you think about it.

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One size doesn't fit all when it comes to products for preventing HIV from anal sexAfter 'trying on' three placebo methods for the delivery of a rectal microbicide, study participants said they could see all of them - a douche, rectal suppository and fast-dissolving rectal insert - fitting into their daily lives.

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"Magic sand" might help us understand the physics of granular matterTokyo, Japan - Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have studied the properties of mixtures of silicone-coated ''magic sand'', a popular kid's toy, and normal sand.

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NASA's Perseverance rover takes its first drive on the surface of MarsNASA's six-wheeled, car-sized astrobiology probe travelled a total of 6.5 metres during a half-hour test spin within Jezero Crater, the site of an ancient, long-vanished lakebed and river delta on the Red Planet.

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White House fears significant number of organisations caught in Microsoft hackMicrosoft initially said the hacks had been "limited and targeted attacks" but as the malware continues to spread, US officials confirm fears there are tens of thousands of organisations affected.

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Perseverance Mars rover: Nasa releases first-drive reviewVehicle had no problem going 6.5 metres, turning and backing up, then photographed its own wheel marks on planets surface.

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Dinosaur-era plants flourish in Tasmania's internationally recognised Jurassic gardenA Tasmanian garden wins international funding to create a Noah's Ark of ancient plant species, some of which have existed for 150 million years.

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How Rosalind Franklin aided our pandemic response and attracting the world's top researchers, despite COVIDCOVID pandemic an apt time to rewrite the significance of Rosalind Franklin Iceberg introduces children to Antarctica.

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Insight Into How Food Texture Affects TasteFood isn't only appealing because it tastes good. Appearance and texture are important too. When food gets mushy or soggy, or ice cream is allowed to thaw - Cell And Molecular Biology.

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Scientists Heal Diseased CoralsThe world's coral reefs face numerous threats, including climate change, pollution, and habitat loss. Since 2014, an aggressive disease has plagued the Florida Reef Tract-the world's third-largest barrier reef system, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

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NASA Mars mission: Perseverance rover begins first movements in search for lifeNASA's Perseverance rover has taken its first drive on the surface of Mars.

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EROSITA X-Ray Telescope Spots Enormous Supernova RemnantAstronomers using data from the eROSITA X-ray telescope aboard the observatory have detected the largest supernova remnant ever discovered with X-rays.

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Some Exceptional Dogs Can Quickly Learn New WordsResearchers have determined that exceptional dogs only have to hear a new word four times before they learn it.

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Restaurant Dining and Mask Use Linked to Virus SpreadIn U.S. counties without mask requirements last year, or in which restaurants reopened, infections and death rates rose.

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Italy says decision to block 250,000 doses of Covid vaccine from Australia was 'not a hostile act'Foreign affairs minister says Europe ravaged by coronavirus and Italy is working according to EU regulation.

The Guardian Shared .

Queensland entrepreneurs use old laptop batteries to help combat global energy crisis among poverty-stricken familiesA Logan social enterprise is turning electronic trash into a global treasure, repurposing old laptop batteries to create a solar-powered solution for poverty-stricken families across the world.

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Mars rover Perseverance takes first spin on surface of red planetNASA's Mars rover Perseverance has taken its first, short drive on the surface of the red planet, two weeks after the robot science lab's picture-perfect touchdown on the floor of a massive crater, mission managers said on Friday.

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VY Canis Majoris is Enshrouded in Giant Dust Clouds, Astronomers SayAstronomers using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope have discovered the reason for the dimming of a red hypergiant star called VY Canis Majoris.

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AstraZeneca hopes to file for emergency use authorization of its COVID vaccine within a few weeksRuud Dobber, executive vice president at AstraZeneca, told CBSN anchor Tanya Rivero on Friday that the drugmaker hopes to receive the results of its clinical trial "in the next few weeks." It then plans on immediately seeking emergency use authorization for its two-dose vaccine from the Food and Drug Administration, he said.

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Why does it feel so good to swear?We don't just use strong words in shock or anger, either. They can help us to bond with others, to express joy, solidarity, or creativity.

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Study shows cactus pear as drought-tolerant crop for sustainable fuel and foodCould cactus pear become a major crop like soybeans and corn in the near future, and help provide a biofuel source, as well as a sustainable food and forage crop?

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Brazil variant can reinfect virus survivors; COVID-19 vaccine antibodies pass into breast milkReuters) - The following is a roundup of some of the latest scientific studies on the novel coronavirus and efforts to find treatments and vaccines for COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus.

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Some LGBTQ People Are Saying 'No Thanks' to the Covid VaccineEvidence suggests that some sexual and gender minorities — especially people of color — are hesitant to get vaccinated due to mistrust of the medical establishment.

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Unusual TrucksBut a truck doesn't have to be long to carry large loads. A building weighing 1,790 tonnes and 75 feet high, sits on top of one of the most unusual trucks ever built.

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Researchers Find Organic Matter and Water in Sample from Asteroid ItokawaAn international team of scientists has studied both the water and organic contents from a dust particle recovered from the surface of the near-Earth S-type asteroid 25143 Itokawa by JAXA’s Hayabusa mission, which was the first mission that brought pristine asteroidal materials to Earth.

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Coronavirus News Roundup, February 27Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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The US Has a Covid 'Scariants' Problem. Here's How to Fix ItResearchers are racing to understand new versions of the coronavirus. But without scientific standards, too many mutants are getting the monster treatment.

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In Oregon, Scientists Find a Virus Variant With a Worrying MutationIn a single sample, geneticists discovered a version of the coronavirus first identified in Britain with a mutation originally reported in South Africa.

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Surprise: Societal Scholars Could Drive Climate PolicyScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

Johnson and Johnson Shots Administered, States Reopen Prematurely, and More Coronavirus NewsCatch up on the most important updates from this week.

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Small volcanic lakes tapping giant underground reservoirsIn its large caldera, Newberry volcano has two small volcanic lakes, one fed by volcanic geothermal fluids and one by gases.

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Blind trust in social media cements conspiracy beliefsThe ability to identify misinformation only benefits people who have some skepticism toward social media, according to a new study from Washington State University.

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Hot Super-Earth Discovered 26 Light-Years AwayAstronomers from the CARMENES consortium have detected a short-period rocky planet orbiting the red dwarf Gliese 486.

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Coastal changes worsen nuisance flooding on many US shorelines, study findsNuisance flooding has increased on U.S. coasts in recent decades due to sea level rise, and new research co-authored by the University of Central Florida uncovered an additional reason for its added frequency.

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NFTs or non-fungible tokens: The new kind of digital art that could prove a bonanza for creatorsDigital artworks called NFTs are selling for thousands, even millions of dollars. Is this a bubble or a new way for artists to finally get paid for digital art?

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What Does Johnson and Johnson's Shot Mean for Our Vaccine Timeline?Plus, the latest on the U.S.'s homegrown COVID-19 variants and Google's data tracking changes.

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Wisconsin Oversteps in Wolf HuntAfter gray wolves were removed from the federal endangered species list, hunters in Wisconsin killed nearly twice the allowed quota of gray wolves.

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In An Uncanny Valley, Art EvolvesThe website ArtBreeder lets you blend, tweak, and evolve existing artworks using biological principles.

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When Is It Time To Say Goodbye?Choosing when to end a conversation is a perplexing psychological problem.

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Talking Through The History Of Our TeethEver wonder why we lose our teeth? Biological anthropologist Shara Bailey has the answers.

Science Friday Shared .

A Look Back At The Time Of The Tasmanian TigerWildlife enthusiasts' hopes were recently raised by a video of what looked like two adult thylacines, better known as the extinct Tasmanian tiger.

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Oregon Just Decriminalized Small Amounts of All Drugs. Now What?Small amounts of all drugs are now legal in Oregon—but the state's addiction and recovery community are still debating if it's a good idea.

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Comet Catalina suggests comets delivered carbon to rocky planetsNow this one-time visitor to our inner solar system is helping explain more about our own origins as it becomes apparent that comets like Catalina could have been an essential source of carbon on planets like Earth and Mars during the early formation of the solar system.

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Going forth with standardized tests may cause more problems than it solvesDespite the many ways that COVID-19 has disrupted schools, the U.S. Department of Education will not give states a pass on giving standardized tests to students this year as it did in spring 2020.

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Vaping Marijuana Worse for Teenagers Than Cigarettes or E-CigarettesConcerns over the potentially harmful effects of vaping have been growing recently and the results of a new study do little to dispel concerns.

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Food security: Irradiation and essential oil vapors for cereal treatmentA combined treatment of irradiation and essential oil vapors could effectively destroy insects, bacteria and mold in stored grains.

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Asteroid Apophis: Colossal 'God of Chaos' asteroid pictured ahead of tonight's safe flybyASTEROID APOPHIS, the 300m-wide space rock named after an Egyptian god of chaos and evil, will safely swing past our planet tonight.

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'I want to ride my bicycle! ' People set to change mobility choices post-lockdownNew research suggests a significant proportion of Trinity's staff and student population that formerly relied on public transport will now choose to walk or cycle to campus when it fully re-opens after lockdown.

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Tantalizing signs of phase-change 'turbulence' in RHIC collisionsPhysicists studying collisions of gold ions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider , a U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science user facility for nuclear physics research at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory, are embarking on a journey through the phases of nuclear matter—the stuff that makes up the nuclei of all the visible matter in...

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Making sense of commotion under the ocean to locate tremors near deep-sea faultsResearchers from Japan and Indonesia have pioneered a new method for more accurately estimating the source of weak ground vibrations in areas where one tectonic plate is sliding under another in the sea.

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Ecosystem services: Species are our livelihoodsFunctioning ecosystems provide the basis for security, basic material needs, health, social interaction and individual liberty.

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Engineering marvel: Sixth mirror cast for Giant Magellan TelescopeThe Giant Magellan Telescope announces fabrication of the sixth of seven of the world's largest monolithic mirrors.

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Life's rich pattern: Researchers use sound to shape the future of printingResearchers in the UK have developed a way to coax microscopic particles and droplets into precise patterns by harnessing the power of sound in air.

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Plan to Rebuild Louisiana's Vanishing Coast Moves AheadAn environmental assessment said the project's next step would largely benefit coastal areas, though it might also affect some marine life, especially dolphins.

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What can stream quality tell us about quality of life?As the source of most of the water we drink and a place where we often go to recreate and enjoy nature, streams represent a crucial point-of-contact between human beings and the environment.

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Sports information on social networks leaves out women, disabled and minority disciplinesResearchers from the University of Seville and Pompeu Fabra University argue that sports information on social media is dominated by men and football.

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Species traded legally through Hong Kong with inadequate traceabilityBiodiversity is declining at an unprecedented rate, due primarily to human activity. Illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade is one of the major drivers of these declines, while much wildlife trade is legal, and the quantity of trade provides the opportunity to launder illegally sourced and traded species and products.

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Study finds no link between gender and physics course performanceA new data-driven study from Texas A&M University casts serious doubt on the stereotype that male students perform better than female students in, physics.

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Using a radical to break C-F bonds one at a timeA team of researchers from the University of Science and Technology of China and the University of California has found a way to use radicals to break C-F bonds one at a time when working with trifluoroacetamides and acetates.

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Instrument at BESSY II shows how light activates molybdenum disulfide layers to become catalystsMoS2 thin films of superposed alternating layers of molybdenum and sulfur atoms form a two-dimensional semiconducting surface.

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New tool finds and fingerprints previously undetected PFAS compounds in watersheds on Cape CodResearchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences found large quantities of previously undetectable compounds from the family of chemicals known as PFAS in six watersheds on Cape Cod using a new method to quantify and identify PFAS compounds.

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Earth's oxygen will run out in 1 billion years and there's nothing we can do 'Inevitable'EARTH'S oxygen-rich atmosphere will be nothing more than a distant memory one billion years from now, terrifying new research has found.

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Now we health workers know how empty Boris Johnson's 'clap for heroes' really wasWe've had a traumatic year and lost patients and colleagues. But all he offers us is a derisory 1% pay offer Rachel Clarke is a palliative care doctor and the author of Breathtaking: Inside the NHS in a Time of Pandemic.

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Wisdom, the World's Oldest Known Wild Bird, Has Another ChickAn albatross named Wisdom has astounded researchers by hatching a chick at more than 70 years old, securing her title as the world's oldest known breeding bird.

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How much influence do humans have over global surface waters?New research published in the journal Nature takes a fresh look at the inescapable anthropogenic impacts on the planet, focusing on the ways that humans ha - Earth And The Environment.

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Light in concert with force reveals how materials become harder when illuminatedSemiconductor materials play an indispensable role in our modern society. For reliable performance of semiconductor devices, these materials need to have superior mechanical properties: they must be strong as well as resistant to fracture, despite being rich in nanoscale structures.

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Compression or strain—the material always expandsAn international research team led by chemist Prof. Thomas Heine of TU Dresden has discovered a new two-dimensional material with unprecedented properties: regardless of whether it is strained or compressed, it always expands.

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Taking 2-D materials for a spinScientists from the University of Tsukuba and a scientist from the Institute of High Pressure Physics detected and mapped the electronic spins moving in a working transistor made of molybdenum disulfide.

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New study suggests humans evolved to run on less water than our closest primate relativesWhen you think about what separates humans from chimpanzees and other apes, you might think of our big brains, or the fact that we get around on two legs rather than four.

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'Fungal ghosts' protect skin, fabric from toxins, radiationThe idea of creating selectively porous materials has captured the attention of chemists for decades.

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Trump's Policy Failures Have Exacted a Heavy Toll on Public HealthScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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NASA's Hubble telescope spots star acting like 'Betelgeuse on steroids'NASA'S Hubble telescope has spotted a distant star dimming and regaining brightness sporadically, much in the same way as the other fading gas giant Betelgeuse.

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Study shows that the GW190521 event could be explained by primordial black holesIn September 2020, the LIGO/Virgo collaboration, a large team of scientists working at different universities worldwide, announced that they had detected most massive gravitational wave binary signal observed to date, which they called GW190521.

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Earth's position and orbit spurred ancient marine life extinctionAncient rocks from Tennessee revealed the Earth's rotation and orbit around the sun controlled the timing of oceanic dead zones in a mass extinction of marine life about 370 million years ago.

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'Falling insect' season length impacts river ecosystemsInsects that fall from the surrounding forest provide seasonal food for fish in streams. Researchers at Kobe University and The University of Tokyo have shown that the lengthening of this period has a profound effect on food webs and ecosystem functions present in streams.

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Alien world discovered: Nearby 'super Earth' could be 'Rosetta Stone' in hunt for aliensASTRONOMERS have discovered a nearby 'super Earth' which could hold the key to finding alien life on distant worlds, with an expert claiming this is the type of discovery scientists had been 'dreaming of'.

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To understand how ‘night-shining' clouds form, scientists made oneA rocket, a bathtub's worth of water and a high-altitude explosion reveal how water vapor cools the air to form shiny ice-crystal clouds.

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BCAS3-C16orf70 complex is a new actor on the mammalian autophagic machineryAutophagy is an intracellular degradation process of cytosolic materials and damaged organelles. Researchers at Ubiquitin Project of TMIMS have been studying the molecular mechanism of mitophagy, the selective autophagy process to eliminate damaged mitochondria.

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The negative effects of powerful political connectionsOne of the motivations for the recently published Journal of Accounting Research paper "Politically Connected Governments" was the daily experience with the subway system in New York City.

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How would digital COVID vaccine passports work? And what's stopping people from faking them?Although international travel restrictions for Australia have been extended to at least June, there may still be potential for a trans-Tasman bubble with New Zealand , according to reports.

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How to build support for ambitious climate action in 4 stepsCanada and the United States are suddenly steeped in policy proposals to aggressively cut carbon emissions.

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Spacewalking astronauts tackle more solar panel advance workFor the second time this week, a pair of astronauts floated outside Friday to get the International Space Station ready for new solar panels.

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Oocyte growth relies on physical phenomena that drive smaller cells to dump their contents into a larger cellEgg cells are by far the largest cells produced by most organisms. In humans, they are several times larger than a typical body cell and about 10,000 times larger than sperm cells.

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Greenland ice loss may have begun as early as the mid-'80sThe amount of snow falling on Greenland's glaciers may have been less than the water lost through icebergs calving and melting since at least the mid-1980s, a study of almost 40 years of satellite images has revealed.

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This tiny echidna moves 7 tons of soil a year, helping tackle climate changeAfter 200 years of European farming practices, Australian soils are in bad shape - depleted of nutrients and organic matter, including carbon.

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Scanning tunneling microscopy reveals the origins of stable skyrmion latticesRIKEN physicists have discovered how interactions between electrons can stabilize a repeating arrangement of swirling magnetic patterns known as skyrmions, which could help to further exploit these structures.

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Calculus instruction methods reveal mechanisms that discourage BIPOC participation in STEMLuis Leyva, assistant professor of mathematics education at Vanderbilt University and director of PRISM at Peabody College, led a research team that recently identified mechanisms in undergraduate calculus instruction that contribute to the function of introductory mathematics as a gatekeeper to STEM majors among Black students, Latin students...

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Planet-hunting eye of PlatoKey technology for ESA's exoplanet-hunting Plato spacecraft has passed a trial by vacuum to prove the mission will work as planned.

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Study finds campus housing can mirror racial denotations of larger societyA new study from the University of Kansas shows that students' experience in campus housing is often marked by racial denotations of who belongs in campus spaces and that the shifting idea of universities as businesses can push students into racially charged spaces that contradict ideas of inclusion.

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Rare earth unlocks copper, gold and silver secretsA study by Monash scientists has found that a rare earth affects the fate of a key reaction with copper, gold, silver, and uranium mineralisation.

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Southwest Iceland is shakingMore than 17,000 earthquakes have been recorded in the southwest of Iceland, in the Reykjanes Peninsula, during the past week.

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New copolymer binder to extend the life of lithium ion batteriesAnyone who has owned a smartphone for over a year is most likely aware that its built-in lithium -ion battery does not hold as much charge as when the device was new.

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Particle detector at Fermilab plays crucial role in Deep Underground Neutrino ExperimentA century ago, physicists didn't know about the existence of neutrinos, the most abundant, elusive and ethereal subatomic particles of matter in the universe.

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Improved understanding of plasma source for synthesis of carbon nanotubesResearchers have developed an insight that could facilitate production of microscopic carbon nanotubes, structures thousands of times thinner than a human hair used in everything from microchips to sporting goods to pharmaceutical products.

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Mining water and metal from the moon at the same timeIn-situ resource utilization is becoming an increasingly popular topic as space exploration begins to focus on landing on the surface of other bodies in the solar system.

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One starfish to rule them allAt 480 million years old, this fossil is the oldest starfish-like creature ever discovered.

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Financial crashes, pandemics, Texas snow: How math could predict 'black swan' eventsWhat if mathematicians could have seen COVID-19 coming, or could predict the next outbreak? Is it possible that numbers, manipulated by statistics, might warn of future market fluctuations and environmental disasters, or herald vast shifts in finance, trade, and employment?

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When Facebook, Twitter flag posts as 'unverified,' readers listenReaders pay attention when social media sites label an article as "unverified" or "suspicious," a new study suggests.

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Asteroid 2021: Leaning Tower of Pisa-sized asteroid flew by at 26,000mphAN ASTEROID as big as the Leaning Tower of Pisa flew by Earth this morning, with NASA revealing the asteroid will shot by at the astronomical speed of 26,000 miles per hour.

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'There is no bomb': what I learned taking a polygraph testAs the UK government plans to extend the use of lie detectors to terrorism and domestic abuse, our science editor puts himself in the hot seat.

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Better warnings needed about health impacts of long-range wildfire smokeSmoke from local wildfires can affect the health of Colorado residents, in addition to smoke from fires in forests as far away as California and the Pacific Northwest.

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Walker 'stunned' to see ship hovering high above sea off CornwallDavid Morris encounters rare optical illusion known as superior mirage while out on coastal stroll.

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How the Milky Way-Andromeda black hole merger may play outSupermassive black holes in the Milky Way and Andromeda will engulf each other less than 17 million years after the galaxies merge, simulations show.

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National Trust map exposes UK landmarks at risk of climate changeTHE NATIONAL TRUST has released an interactive map showing where in the UK will be the hardest hit by climate change in the coming years.

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Human-caused climate change, not nature, is behind changes in Atlantic hurricane cycles, new study findsScientists thought the decades-long cycle of active and slower hurricane seasons was a natural pattern - but new research suggests otherwise.

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You're Vaccinated and People Want to Visit. Now What?After getting fully inoculated against Covid-19, here are some scenarios that prove the New Normal isn't normal at all.

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New Zealand earthquake: Videos and images show effects of small tsunamiNEW ZEALAND has been hit by a flurry of earthquakes which sparked tsunami warnings and caused major waves - which dozens of people have managed to capture on camera with incredible footage.

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The Famed Painting The Scream Holds a Hidden MessageScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

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Some microbial hitchhikers may weaken body's attack on COVID-19New research identifies an altered mix of microbes in the body — ones commonly seen in people with poor diets — that may worsen coronavirus disease.

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COVID-19 exacerbated the troubling U.S. trend of premature deathsThe pandemic played into already rising death rates from obesity, drugs, alcohol and suicide.

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Full moon dates for 2021, including March's Worm MoonFull moons illuminate the sky every month, but why do they have different names?

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How Rhode Island Fell to the CoronavirusA dense population of vulnerable citizens set the stage for a frightening epidemic.

The New York Times Shared .

Can Long-Term Care Employers Require Staff Members to Be Vaccinated?As legal experts and ethicists debate, some companies aren't waiting.

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Temperature scanners being used to check for covid can be wildly inaccurate, researchers findThe utility of these devices as fever screeners is now highly questionable, and arguably a risk to public health, because they actively report fevers as normal'

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Apes at San Diego Zoo become first non-human primates to receive COVID-19 vaccineNine great apes at the San Diego Zoo, where a number of gorillas tested positive for coronavirus earlier this year, are doing well after receiving COVID-19 vaccines.

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New Zealand earthquakes: Tremors could trigger volcano eruptions, expert warnsEARTHQUAKES hitting New Zealand could trigger a volcanic eruption across the highly seismic region, an expert has warned in the wake of yesterdays powerful tremors.

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Weirdhouse Cinema: Split SecondThis week on Weirdhouse Cinema, world's grumpiest detective Rutger Hauer investigates a series of monstrous murders in the climate change-ravaged future of 2008.

Stuff To Blow Your Mind Shared .

New Zealand tsunami map: Alert over following NZ earthquakeA TSUNAMI warning was issued for parts of New Zealand after a major magnitude 8.1 earthquake rocked Kermadec Islands.

Express Shared .

Spacewatch: Venus terrain revealed by Nasa solar probeImage unexpectedly shows light and dark features, including Aphrodite Terra, a highland area near planets equator.

The Guardian Shared .

COVID and climate complexity, memory athletics, life on Earth is lucky, frogs do noise cancellation, speaking to the dreaming and hot air risingCOVID gave climate scientists a natural experiment. Here's what they learned; Flexing memory muscles like the pros can build long term memories; Do you feel lucky?

Quirks & Quarks Shared .

Overweight children exposed to lead in utero may have poor future kidney functionNew York, NY - Overweight children who were exposed to lead in utero and during their first weeks of life have the potential for poorer kidney function in adulthood, according to an Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai study published in Environment International in March.

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Beauty is in the brain: AI reads brain data, generates personally attractive imagesResearchers at the University of Helsinki and University of Copenhagen have succeeded in making an AI understand our subjective notions of what makes faces attractive.

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Variable compensation and salesperson health''Hidden costs'' of variable compensation can cause stress and directly counter the hoped-for positive effects on performance.

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Sports information on social networks leaves out women, disabled and minority disciplinesResearchers from the University of Seville and Pompeu Fabra University argue that sports information on social media is dominated by men and football.

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Charting our changing citiesThe global outbreak has resulted in remarkable shifts in city living. Researchers can take the lead in kickstarting conversations on public policies for cities of the future, say SMU professors.

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Significant gender disparities revealed in COVID-19 clinical trial leadershipLess than one-third of COVID-19 clinical trials are led by women, which is half the proportion observed in non-COVID-19 trials, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London, University of St Andrews, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School.

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Species traded legally through Hong Kong with inadequate traceabilityResearchers from the Conservation Forensics Lab at HKU and Research Division for Ecology and Biodiversity, analyzed trends in global legal wildlife trade from 1997 to 2016, and revealed that legal wildlife trade averaged $220 billion per year over this period, approximately double the international trade in tea, coffee and spices, and eclipsing...

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Compression or strainAn international research team led by chemist Prof. Thomas Heine of TU Dresden has discovered a new two-dimensional material with unprecedented properties: regardless if it is strained or compressed, it always expands.

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New method facilitates development of antibody-based drugsIn recent years, therapeutic antibodies have transformed the treatment of cancer and autoimmune diseases. Now, researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a new, efficient method based on the genetic scissors CRISPR-Cas9, that facilitates antibody development.

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Call me, maybe? UNLV study probes how people connected during the pandemicUNLV social media expert Natalie Pennington shares the top 10 takeaways of research on the impact of video chats, email, online gaming, and other communication tech on stress, loneliness, and relationships.

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Comet Catalina suggests comets delivered carbon to rocky planetsComet Catalina is helping explain more about our own origins as it becomes apparent that comets like Catalina could have been an essential source of carbon on planets like Earth and Mars during the early formation of the solar system.

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How does your brain process emotions? Answer could help address loneliness epidemicIn a study published in the March 5, 2021 online edition of Cerebral Cortex, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that specific regions of the brain respond to emotional stimuli related to loneliness and wisdom in opposing ways.

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Small volcanic lakes tapping giant underground reservoirsBoulder, Colo., USA: In its large caldera, Newberry volcano has two small volcanic lakes, one fed by volcanic geothermal fluids and one by gases.

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Three-layered masks most effective against large respiratory dropletsA team of researchers has shown that three-layered surgical masks are more effective than single or double-layered masks at stopping large droplets from a cough or sneeze from penetrating through the mask.

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What can stream quality tell us about quality of life?Their findings, published in the journal Ecological Indicators, reveal that demographics such as race and population density, as well as health indices such as cancer rates and food insecurity, show strong correlations with water quality across the Commonwealth of Virginia.

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Controlling adhesions in the abdomenAdhesions are scars in the abdomen, which can occur after surgery, often have serious consequences.

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FDA authorizes Johnson and Johnson vaccine, set to begin shipping out this weekA third vaccine is joining the race to vaccinate America against the coronavirus. The FDA authorized the Johnson and Johnson vaccine over the weekend, and is about to ship out.

CBS News Shared .

Gottlieb says downward trend in virus infections "likely to continue"Dr. Scott Gottlieb, the former FDA commissioner, says "we should be optimistic" about a dramatic decline in the number of new coronavirus infections.

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WorldView: U.K. hospitals still strained; Hong Kong charges pro-democracy activistsDespite a successful vaccine rollout so far, ICUs in Britain are still bearing the brunt of the pandemic.

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Johnson and Johnson begins distributing COVID-19 vaccine as pressure mounts on Senate to pass relief billJohnbson and Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine has begun distribution, but even as vaccine efforts ramp up, health officials are cautioning people not to relax just yet as variants continue to spread.

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Israel rolls out "vaccine passport" systemIsrael is implementing a program requiring people to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination before accessing facilities like gyms.

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"About as big as it gets": South Pacific quake triggered tsunami warningsThe tsunami threat caused traffic jams and some chaos in New Zealand as people scrambled to get to higher ground.

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Global warming led to ancient mass extinction event, scientists sayAccording to new research, a rise of greenhouse gases 250 million years ago led to the disappearance of most life on Earth.

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COVID-19 vaccination efforts pick up speed as states begin easing restrictionsVaccinations in the U.S. are picking up speed, but some states are facing pushback for lifting mask rules and other restrictions.

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The Great Dying: Earth's largest-ever mass extinction is a warning for humanityScientists say the mass extinction 250 million years ago offers a timely warning to humanity of what can happen when ecosystems change too fast for life to keep up.

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Popular Drug Does Not Alleviate Mild Covid-19 Symptoms, Study FindsIvermectin, a drug typically used to treat parasitic worms, has been prescribed widely during the coronavirus pandemic, but rigorous data has been lacking.

The New York Times Shared .

States ease COVID restrictions as vaccine effort ramps upEven as millions more Americans are vaccinated every day, there are growing concerns that states are easing restrictions too soon, which could lead to another surge.

CBS News Shared .

Some Scientists Question W.H.O. Inquiry Into the Coronavirus Pandemic's OriginsThose who still suspect the outbreak in China may have been caused by a lab leak or accident are pressing for an independent investigation.

The New York Times Shared .

The Legend Of The Chronovisor, The Vatican's Secret Time MachineIn the 1960s, Benedictine monk Pellegrino Ernetti claimed that he helped create a time machine called the Chronovisor — and hid it in the Vatican.

All That's Interesting Shared .

Alabama governor extending face mask mandate until AprilGovernor Kay Ivey said after April 9, it will be a matter of "personal responsibility" if Alabamians should wear a face covering.

CBS News Shared .

Investigation into Covid Origins SoughtSome scientists are calling for an investigation independent of that under way by a team of scientists and the World Health Organization into the source of the novel coronavirus outbreak in China.

The New York Times Shared .

CVS and Walgreens blamed for COVID-19 vaccine issues with nation's oldest and most vulnerable populationCritics say CVS and Walgreens are to blame for a slow rollout of COVID-19 vaccines meant for residents of nursing homes and long-term care facilities.

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Mammoths Co-Existed with Early Americans in New England, Study SuggestsThe so-called Mount Holly mammoth lived approximately 12,800 years ago in what is now New England, a region comprising six states in the Northeastern United States, and potentially overlapped with the first human settlers of the region, according to new research from Dartmouth College.

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With Trump out of office, U.S. rejoins Paris climate accordThe United States formally rejoins the Paris Agreement today, after former President Trump withdrew from the treaty.

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Smaller, Better, Faster, Stronger: the "Antibodies" of the FutureThese days, we're pretty good at harnessing the power of antibodies for medicines and as molecular tools, but they do have some drawbacks.

Sci Show Shared .

Most pro athletes who got COVID-19 didn't develop heart inflammationFew professional athletes developed heart inflammation after a bout of COVID-19, but how the findings relate to the general public isn't clear.

Science News Shared .

U.K. warns a second national lockdown may be needed as COVID-19 cases riseMore than 40,000 people in Britain have died of COVID-19 since the start of the pandemic in March, and cases are rising again.

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Zambia among Sub-Saharan African countries that have not yet received any vaccinesWhile more than 60 million vaccine doses have been administered in the U.S., the country of Zambia has not yet received any vaccines.

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Johnson and Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine could soon join fight against pandemicThe FDA is reviewing the Johnson and Johnson COVID-19 vaccine and it could get emergency authorization by the end of the week.

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Volunteers save hundreds of coastal WA birds from fishhooks in beaks, plastic and paralysing infectionsEach year, volunteers across WA's south-west coast rescue hundreds of coastal birds entangled in fishing line and fishhooks, caught in plastic waste, or paralysed by naturally occurring bacteria.

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New Zealand tsunami: World's strongest quake in 2 years rocks Kermadec IslandsA MAGNITUDE 8.1 earthquake rocked New Zealand today, prompting tsunami alerts and widespread evacuation orders along New Zealand's coast.

Express Shared .

One and Done: Why People Are Eager for Johnson and Johnson's VaccineJohnson and Johnson's one-shot vaccine is allowing states to rethink distribution, even as health officials and experts worry some will view it as inferior.

The New York Times Shared .

Nurse practitioner discusses expected CDC guidance for people who've been vaccinatedThe CDC is expected to release updated guidance soon for people who have been vaccinated against COVID-19.

CBS News Shared .

Nightside of Hot Super-Earth LHS 3844b is Tectonically Active: StudyLHS 3844b's hemispheric tectonics is the direct consequence of a significant temperature contrast between its day - and nightside and is absent in the present-day Solar System.

Sci News Shared .

Uncovering history with Little Foot's skullProfessor Corinne Le Quéré explains how she managed to look past the 7% reduction in human emissions caused by the pandemic in 2020 to reveal the impact of the Paris Climate agreements, and explains what more needs to be done.

Science in Action Shared .

Research station on Macquarie Island to undergo renovationsIt's some 1,550 kilometres away from the closest hardware store, but work is underway to lay the foundations of a renovation project on the remote and rugged Macquarie Island that will take seven years to complete.

ABC Science News Shared .

Biden criticizes Texas and Mississippi for "Neanderthal thinking" behind lifting mask mandatesGovernors in Texas and Mississippi are reversing their mask mandates before high-risk groups are fully vaccinated.

CBS News Shared .

Johnson and Johnson begins rolling out nearly 4 million coronavirus vaccine dosesThe U.S. now has a third vaccine to fight the coronavirus. Johnson and Johnson began shipping out nearly 4 million doses of its single-dose vaccine after it received emergency use approval from the FDA.

CBS News Shared .

Humans Arrived in Northern Bahamas Earlier than ThoughtNew evidence indicates that Lucayans - an Arawakan-speaking Taíno people, whose name translates as ‘island men' in the native Arawakan language - arrived in the northern Bahamas by about 830 CE.

Sci News Shared .

Meet Diana Trujillo, a trailblazing flight director for NASA's Mars Perseverance roverNASA aerospace engineer Diana Trujillo came to the U.S. with only $300 and worked housekeeping jobs to pay for school.

CBS News Shared .

Seafloor Sediment Bacteria Have Been ResuscitatedScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

Cuttlefish Pass Fishy Version of ‘Marshmallow Test'New research led by the University of Cambridge and the Marine Biological Laboratory demonstrates that common cuttlefish can tolerate delays to obtain food of higher quality.

Sci News Shared .

Meet the latest member of Hokie Nation, a newly discovered millipede that lives at Virginia TechHearing the words "new species discovered" may conjure images of deep caves, uncharted rainforests, or hidden oases in the desert.

Phys.org Shared .

Breaking the patrisharky: Scientists reexamine gender biases in shark, ray mating researchShark scientists at Georgia Aquarium, Scripps Institution of Oceanography at UC San Diego, and Dalhousie University are challenging the status quo in shark and ray mating research in a new study that looks at biological drivers of multiple paternity in these animals.

Phys.org Shared .

Citizen science study captures 2.2M wildlife images in NCYou didn't need a Ph.D. to contribute to research into wildlife abundance and behavior in North Carolina, thanks to a large-scale citizen science project led by North Carolina State University researchers.

Phys.org Shared .

Animal aggression depends on rank within social hierarchiesHumans and animals alike constantly size up one another. In the workplace, a new employee quickly learns which coworkers are the most respected—and therefore hold more power.

Phys.org Shared .

The magic vibrational powers of frog lungsEver tried picking someone up at a loud, crowded bar? It's not easy - not only may they not hear your fabulous pick-up line, but getting them to recognize that you're a compatible mate with your witty follow-up with that much din in the background is a feat.

LabRoots Shared .

Alien 'super-Earth' may offer clues about atmospheres on distant worldsScientists have spotted a planet orbiting a star relatively near our solar system that may offer a prime opportunity to study the atmosphere of a rocky Earth-like alien world - the type of research that could aid the hunt for extraterrestrial life.

Reuters Shared .

Fata MorganaThe horizon is an interesting netherworld of optical phenomena, where - to the human eye - ghost ships may sail the sky, phantom islands offer relief to weary sailors, sea monsters tower and alien ships enter the atmosphere.

Stuff To Blow Your Mind Shared .

Super-Earth discovered: Data will characterize planetary atmosphere modelsDuring the past 25 years astronomers have discovered a wide variety of exoplanets, made of rock, ice and gas, thanks to the construction of astronomical instruments designed specifically for planet searches.

Phys.org Shared .

Social distancing in natureForager ants do it, vampire bats do it, guppies do it, and mandrills do it.

Phys.org Shared .

Key factor identified that makes worms feel full after a good mealIn nematode worms, a key controller allows the worm to sense when it needs food and when it feels full, and then changes its behavior accordingly.

Phys.org Shared .

Dramatic decline in western butterfly populations linked to fall warmingWestern butterfly populations are declining at an estimated rate of 1.6% per year, according to a new report to be published this week in Science.

Phys.org Shared .

By detecting genetic material, fast sensor has potential use as a clinical toolIn less than a second, a small sensor used in brain chemistry research can detect the key molecules that provide the genetic instructions for life, RNA and DNA, a new study from American University shows.

Phys.org Shared .

High strength through hierarchy: Researchers develop new process for building ultralight materialsAs light as possible and as strong as possible at the same time: These are the requirements for modern lightweight materials, such as those used in aircraft construction and the automotive industry.

Phys.org Shared .

Satellites capture formation of enormous iceberg A74 on Antarctica's Brunt Ice ShelfSee how a iceberg breaks from the Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica, the first large iceberg to calve from this shelf in 50 years.

ABC Science News Shared .

Forming the early heartHeart Development The heart is the first organ to form during development and is critical for the survival of the embryo.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

A cellular cholesterol sensorStructural Biology Cholesterol levels in cells are controlled by the sterol regulatory element-binding protein pathway.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Some like it hot, others notEnzyme Evolution Enzymes strike a delicate balance between features that enhance chemical reactivity and those that contribute to stable structure.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Turning a tumor suppressor into a targetCancer Tumor-suppressor genes such as TP53 play key roles in the pathogenesis of cancer but, unfortunately, they are difficult to target because they do not create an overactive protein that can be inhibited with a drug.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Toward a universal influenza vaccineInfluenza The development of a universal influenza vaccine is of paramount importance because seasonal vaccines vary in terms of protection.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

A transiting rocky planet 8 parsecs awayExoplanets Most exoplanets have been detected using either the radial velocity method or the transit method, which provide only limited information on the planet's physical properties.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Sperm-specific natural selectionSperm Genomics Sperm cells are genetically haploid, but because of the cytoplasmic bridges that link cells, they can be transcriptionally diploid.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Phenazines liberate phosphateMicrobiology Bacteria secrete a wide range of small molecules with chemical reactivity that offers multiple functions in different contexts.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Electron dynamics in time and spaceSpectroscopy Following molecular excitation and electron transfer processes in time and space within a single experiment is a long-standing goal of spectroscopy in the field of chemistry.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

The source of the leak in sepsisPhysiology A challenge in treating the systemic inflammation that occurs in sepsis is the increase in endothelial permeability that leads to widespread tissue edema and immune cell infiltration.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

A red-letter day for RBC researchHematology The study of primary human red blood cell disorders such as sickle cell disease and infectious diseases such as malaria has been hampered by a lack of in vivo models of human erythropoiesis.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Nature's "responsible" response to diseaseInfectious Disease With the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic, there have been global calls for the implementation of "social distancing" to control transmission.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Warming autumns, fewer butterfliesInsect Declines Many recent studies have revealed sweeping declines in insects over the past few decades.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Primordial GATA6 macrophages function as extravascular platelets in sterile injuryGATA6+ macrophages resident in body cavities exhibit both phagocytic and repair functions. However, the mechanisms by which these cells can identify and migrate to sites of injury have remained unclear.

Science | AAAS Shared .

WHO's treatment megatrial is at a standstillScience's COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Heising-Simons Foundation The only global trial of potential COVID-19 treatments is languishing.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Data in paper about Swedish schoolchildren come under firePediatrician and epidemiologist Jonas Ludvigsson of Sweden's Karolinska Institute has been a staunch defender of his country's unorthodox coronavirus policies.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Life could use oxygen long before it was abundantThe first organisms to "breathe" oxygen—or at least use it—appeared 3.1 billion years ago, according to a new genetic analysis of dozens of families of microbes.

Science | AAAS Shared .

First Brazilian-made satellite watches the AmazonBrazil's first entirely home-built satellite has joined the fleet of spacecraft monitoring threats to the country's tropical rainforest, the world's largest.

Science | AAAS Shared .

The genes behind the sexiest birds on the planetFor a glimpse of the power of sexual selection, the dance of the golden-collared manakin is hard to beat.

Science | AAAS Shared .

NIH apologizes for ‘structural racism,' pledges changeNational Institutes of Health. Director Francis Collins this week issued an unusual public apology for what he called "structural racism in biomedical research" and pledged to address it with a sweeping set of actions.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Nuclear medicineAfter 10 years advising survivors of the Fukushima disaster about radiation, Masaharu Tsubokura thinks the evacuations posed a far bigger health risk.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Endless cleanupDismantling the Fukushima nuclear plant will take at least another 30 years. Much of northeastern Japan is well along in recovering from the magnitude 9 earthquake and 40-meter tsunami of 11 March 2011.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Science at Sundance 2021Like most events that have taken place since March of last year, the Sundance Film Festival—normally hosted in the cozy ski town of Park City, Utah—was held virtually in 2021.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Deforestation, forestation, and water supplyForests as natural reservoirs and filters can store, release, and purify water through their interactions with hydrological processes.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Whirls and swirls of polarizationALTOUNIAN/ SCIENCE Guo et al. have now extended this exciting direction in ferroelectrics to a new class of materials based on the ferroelectric polymer poly, or P.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Surgical adhesions: A sticky macrophage problemBICKEL/ SCIENCE An important connection was made to repair processes in invertebrates, such as the purple sea urchin, that also have a body cavity.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Eyeless worms detect colorAnimals use color vision to explore their environment, recognize mates, avoid predators, and guide feeding decisions.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Targeting cancer with bispecific antibodiesProtein-based immunotherapies offer the possibility of generic or "off-the-shelf" immunotherapies, different from the highly personalized approach of engineered immune cell therapies.

Science | AAAS Shared .

News at a glanceSCI COMMUN### COVID-19 Johnson and Johnson last week became the third COVID-19 vaccinemaker to receive emergency use authorization for its product from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Science's new frontierThe year 2020 saw a reusable rocket launch two astronauts into space, multiple COVID-19 vaccines developed in record time, and a robot that could write a persuasive op-ed.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Polarization hits a bull's-eyeFerroelectrics Polymer-based ferroelectric materials are attractive because they can be solution processed cheaply and have much greater flexibility than ceramics.

Science | AAAS Shared .

A heavy black hole in an x-ray binaryBlack Holes If a black hole interacts with a binary companion star, the system emits x-rays and can form a radio jet.

Science | AAAS Shared .

A new way to "see" colorSensory Perception Color perception is an important aspect of the way many organisms navigate their world.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Co-opting erythrocyte clearanceT Cells Whereas T cell dysfunction contributes to immune evasion in cancer and chronic viral infection, strategies that induce dysfunction in autoreactive T cells may facilitate self-tolerance.

Science | AAAS Shared .

All-in-one photocatalystPhotocatalysis Photocatalysis is a complex process that involves multiple steps such as light absorption, electron-hole separation, and surface reactions.

Science | AAAS Shared .

First in place may not be the winnerNeurodevelopment The human brain matures more slowly than the brains of nonhuman primates. A key question is to what extent the timing of neuronal development is determined by the neurons themselves rather than by their setting within the developing brain.

Science | AAAS Shared .

LeftNeuroscience Multiple pathways transmit movement commands from the brain down the spinal cord. In mammals, especially in primates, the corticospinal tract is the dominant system.

Science | AAAS Shared .