Science

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Shark attack: Scientists find great whites with livers ripped out by orca killer whalesGREAT WHITE sharks with their innards gutted in a 'precise and refined' way have shed light on a deadly predator stalking the oceans near South Africa.

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Scientists Sequence Y Chromosome DNA of Denisovans and NeanderthalsA team of geneticists from the United States, China and Europe has sequenced the paternally inherited Y chromosomes from three Neanderthals and two Denisovans.

Sci News Shared .

New marine protected areas connect hundreds of kilometres of Turkey's Mediterranean coastThree hundred and fifty square kilometers of Turkey's coastline has been brought under environmental protection in a recent announcement by the Turkish government.

Phys.org Shared .

Cynicism, autonomy and job satisfaction: Evidence from teaching professionResearch published in the International Journal of Management in Education has sought to ascertain whether there is a relationship between the psychological characteristics of cynicism, autonomy, and job satisfaction in teachers.

Phys.org Shared .

New method allows precise gene control by lightA novel optical switch makes it possible to precisely control the lifespan of genetic copies.

Phys.org Shared .

Diagnostic tool for coronavirus makes significant step forwardScientists at the University of Warwick have demonstrated that a potential diagnostic tool for detecting COVID-19 using sugars will work with a virus rather than just its proteins, a significant step in making it a viable test in future.

Phys.org Shared .

Researchers work to create a roadmap on quantum materialsThe term 'quantum materials' was introduced to highlight the exotic properties of unconventional superconductors, heavy-fermion systems and multifunctional oxides.

Phys.org Shared .

Scientists capture light in a polymeric quasicrystalITMO University scientists have conducted several experiments to investigate polymeric quasicrystals that ultimately confirmed their initial theory.

Phys.org Shared .
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Fast, accurate and non-destructive: The new method to analyze food qualityConsumers always look for good quality products, above all in fresh food like vegetables. But how do we measure the quality of fresh spinach before it gets on the market nowadays?

Phys.org Shared .

NASA finds post-tropical storm Beta's clouds blanketing the Southeastern USNASA's Terra satellite obtained visible imagery of Post-Tropical Cyclone Beta as it continued moving slowly through the Tennessee Valley.

Phys.org Shared .

Education: An influencing factor for intergenerational mobility in CanadaThe relationship between the income levels of parents and their children once they reach adulthood is complex, but education could be one of the factors that influence Canadian intergenerational mobility.

Phys.org Shared .

SpaceX handed loss in challenge over Air Force contractReuters) - A federal judge plans to deny SpaceX's challenge to U.S. Air Force contracts awarded to its rivals, writing in a Thursday court filing that the Pentagon properly assessed the development of SpaceX CEO Elon Musk's Starship rocket system as "too risky and expensive."

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Dark matter mystery: Galaxy packed with 'invisible' substance vexes scientistsA GALAXY packed to the brim with dark matter has confounded scientists who are yet to crack the cosmic mystery.

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Physicists develop a method to improve gravitational wave detector sensitivityGravitational wave detectors have opened a new window to the universe by measuring the ripples in spacetime produced by colliding black holes and neutron stars, but they are ultimately limited by quantum fluctuations induced by light reflecting off of mirrors.

Phys.org Shared .

NASA finds wind shear displacing Lowell's strongest stormsNASA's Aqua satellite provided an infrared view of Tropical Storm Lowell that revealed the effects of outside winds battering the storm.

Phys.org Shared .

Reusing tableware can reduce waste from online food deliveriesLifestyles in China are changing rapidly, and ordering food online is an example. However, those billions of delivery meals produce an enormous amount of plastic waste from packaging, but also from food containers and cutlery; in one year, some 7.3 billion sets of single-use tableware accompany the food.

Phys.org Shared .

Theater improvisation techniques show promising results for science classroom engagementA researcher at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County has developed a unique method to improve class participation in a graduate-level thermodynamics course by incorporating theater improvisation activities in the classroom.

Phys.org Shared .

An enhanced ruthenium-based catalyst for primary amine synthesisResearchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a high-performance reusable ruthenium-based catalyst for the production of primary amines.

Phys.org Shared .

New funerary and ritual behaviors of the Neolithic Iberian populations discoveredExperts from the Department of Prehistory and Archaeology of the University of Seville have just published a study in the prestigious journal PLOS ONE on an important archaeological find in the Cueva de la Dehesilla.

Phys.org Shared .

Secure nano-carrier delivers medications directly to cellsMedications often have unwanted side-effects. One reason is that they reach not only the unhealthy cells for which they are intended, but also reach and have an impact on healthy cells.

Phys.org Shared .

New way of analyzing soil organic matter will help predict climate changeA new way of analyzing the chemical composition of soil organic matter will help scientists predict how soils store carbon—and how soil carbon may affect climate in the future, says a Baylor University researcher.

Phys.org Shared .

Spin clean-up method brings practical quantum computers closer to realityQuantum computers are the new frontier in advanced research technology, with potential applications such as performing critical calculations, protecting financial assets, or predicting molecular behavior in pharmaceuticals.

Phys.org Shared .

RAP tag: A new protein purification approachWhether it's our diets, building strength, or as part of medical advancements, it is no secret that proteins form an important part of our lives.

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Major wind-driven ocean currents are shifting toward the polesThe severe droughts in the USA and Australia are the first sign that the tropics, and their warm temperatures, are apparently expanding in the wake of climate change.

Phys.org Shared .

A clearer view of what makes glass rigidResearchers led by The University of Tokyo employed a new computer model to simulate the networks of force-carrying particles that give amorphous solids their strength even though they lack long range order.

Phys.org Shared .

Archaeologists Find 13,000-Year-Old Engraved Mammoth Tusk in SiberiaThe 13,000-year-old partial tusk of an adult mammoth found in western Siberia has four images of two-humped camels engraved on it.

Sci News Shared .

Space news: Astronomers detect first-ever signs of a planet in another galaxyASTRONOMERS may have found evidence of an extragalactic planet beyond the Milky Way, some 23 million light-years from Earth.

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Researchers find California wildfires shrink partisan differences about climate change strategiesWhen the smoke from recent wildfires caused an eerie, orange sky to darken San Francisco for an entire day earlier this month, the cultural conversation took an apocalyptic turn.

Phys.org Shared .

'Any breed could do it': dogs might be a Covid tester's best friendResearchers around the world are training canines to sniff out the virus - could they be deployed for mass testing?

The Guardian Shared .

UK scientists begin study of how long Covid can survive in the airResearchers will test length of time virus stays infectious in different climatic conditions.

The Guardian Shared .

Not accounting for sex differences in Covid research could be deadlyAnalysis suggests too little attention is paid to gender disparities in medical trials.

The Guardian Shared .

Humans ignite almost every wildfire that threatens homesSummer and fall are wildfire season across the western U.S. In recent years, wildfires have destroyed thousands of homes, forced hundreds of thousands of people to evacuate and exposed tens of millions to harmful smoke.

Phys.org Shared .

Blasts from the past: how ice age ponds are coming back to lifeOnce watering holes for mammoth and elk, Herefordshire's neglected ancient ponds are being restored.

The Guardian Shared .

Smart bulk plastic reacts to light, temperature and humidityImagine that products have a longer shelf life because of smart packaging, that plastic robots are driven by their environment, and that clothing adapts while being worn.

Phys.org Shared .

You wouldn't hit a dog, so why kill one in Minecraft? Why violence against virtual animals is an ethical issueViolence against animals in video games is ubiquitous. Players can kill or torture animals in various popular games, including Minecraft and Grand Theft Auto V. The rise of this trend in games, along with people's tendency to go along with it, raises important questions.

Phys.org Shared .

At Climate Week, America's Cascading Disasters DominateThis year's events come amid a climate reckoning in the world's richest country. Here are the takeaways.

The New York Times Shared .

Most Angelenos say climate change is a threat—but few act accordinglyAnew report shows that a solid majority of Los Angeles County residents believe that climate change is caused by human activity and that it poses a threat to their well-being.

Phys.org Shared .

First candidate for an extragalactic planet identifiedA team of researchers from the U.S. and China has found the first evidence for a candidate planet in another galaxy.

Phys.org Shared .

Deforestation squeezes top predators in forest streamsStreams in areas converted to oil palm have different top predators to those flowing through intact forests, affecting stream food webs.

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The use of graph neural networks to discover particlesMachine learning algorithms can beat the world's hardest video games in minutes and solve complex equations faster than the collective efforts of generations of physicists.

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Software program Allchemy identifies prebiotic synthesis of biochemical compounds from primordial precursorsA team of researchers working in the Institute of Organic Chemistry's lab at the Polish Academy of Sciences has developed a software product to aid in discovering the chemical processes that led to the development of life on Earth.

Phys.org Shared .

Image: Tarawa, KiribatiThe Copernicus Sentinel-2 mission takes us over the Tarawa Atoll in the Republic of Kiribati - a remote Pacific nation threatened by rising seas.

Phys.org Shared .

Provably exact artificial intelligence for nuclear and particle physicsThe Standard Model of particle physics describes all the known elementary particles and three of the four fundamental forces governing the universe; everything except gravity.

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The molecules responsible for transcriptional burstingNew insights into what causes neighboring, genetically identical stem cells in mouse embryos to behave differently in terms of the proteins they produce could have implications for regenerative medicine and the early detection of cancer.

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Study delivers new knowledge about what causes thunderstorms and cloud burstsThunderstorms often provoke violent cloud bursts that can result in devastating flooding. But what actually spawns thunderstorms and cloud bursts?

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Scientists investigate the origin of the Quaternary valleys in the Iberian peninsulaGeologists at the Centro Nacional de Investigación sobre la Evolución Humana contributed to a study published recently in the journal Global and Planetary Change exploring one of the geomorphological paradigms of the Iberian Peninsula: the origin and chronology of the earliest Quaternary valleys.

Phys.org Shared .

Primate brain size does not predict their intelligenceChimpanzees, gorillas and orangutans are our closest relatives, and like us they have relatively large brains and they are very intelligent.

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Astronomers model, determine how disk galaxies evolve so smoothlyComputer simulations are showing astrophysicists how massive clumps of gas within galaxies scatter some stars from their orbits, eventually creating the smooth, exponential fade in the brightness of many galaxy disks.

Phys.org Shared .

Research links sinking land to regions of high groundwater demandExcessive pumping from underground aquifers can cause the surrounding land to sink and lead to damage to streets, bridges and other infrastructure, reduced groundwater storage, and contaminated drinking water, according to researchers at Missouri S&T.

Phys.org Shared .

Drug court reduces risk of reconviction in the long term, new research findsTreating drug-related offenders is far more effective than sending them to prison, according to new research conducted jointly by the National Drug and Alcohol Research Center at UNSW Sydney and the NSW Bureau of Crime Statistics and Research.

Phys.org Shared .

We looked at 35 years of rainfall and learned how droughts start in the Murray-Darling BasinThe extreme, recent drought has devastated many communities around the Murray-Darling Basin, but the processes driving drought are still not well understood.

Phys.org Shared .

Greyhound pups must be tracked from birth to death, so we know how many are killedIt's been more than four years since New South Wales greyhound racing was rocked by a special inquiry that found overwhelming evidence of systemic animal cruelty, including mass killings.

Phys.org Shared .

The realization of active microscale Marangoni surfersMarangoni surfers are small particles that self-propel while straddling a fluid-fluid interface in a way similar to that in which a surfer moves on the surface of a wave.

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New study reveals that soil is a significant carbon sequestration driverAs harmful atmospheric carbon dioxide levels continue to increase, understanding the planet's carbon balance is increasingly important.

Phys.org Shared .

What's Behind Those Colorful Leaves?It may seem like magic, but each leaf's new look comes from chemical changes happening within.

The New York Times Shared .

A€˜Sign of magma rushing towards surfacea€™ identified in chilling Yellowstone volcano warningA YELLOWSTONE VOLCANO eruption would spark devastation across the world, and a science writer identified how the chilling scenario would unfold.

Express Shared .

Fish Eggs Survive Journey through a DuckScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

How Genetics Can Inform Our Understanding of ADHDScientists have discovered that African-Americans and people of European ancestry may have different genetic causes of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.

LabRoots Shared .

Meteor showers to watch out for in 2020, including the Draconids and OrionidsMeteor showers come and go throughout the year, but when can you spot them in 2020?

The Telegraph Shared .

Full moon dates for 2020, including October's Harvest MoonFull moons illuminate the sky every month, but why do they have different names?

The Telegraph Shared .

MS treatment a step closer after drug shown to repair nerve coatingSide-effects of bexarotene rule out use, but trial suggests other drugs may halt multiple sclerosis.

The Guardian Shared .

Strangers: Stories about the people we don't knowThis week we present two stories from people who had experiences with strangers. Part 1: Even though he's an excellent student, and later a doctor, Dale Okorodudu finds that strangers perceive him differently.

The Story Collider Shared .

Why Is It So Hard to Study Covid-Related Smell Loss?Patients have long reported the sudden inability to smell. But restrictions on in-person exams are complicating efforts to figure out what's going on.

Wired UK Shared .

How to Distribute a COVID-19 Vaccine EthicallyScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

A€˜Einstein was wrong! a€™ Scientistsa€™ call for new theory of relativity after black hole findA BLACK HOLE discovery led scientists to call for a new theory to explain what happens at the centre of these cosmic anomalies, with one scientist pointing to the possibility that 'Einstein's theory of general relativity is not correct.'

Express Shared .

Fruit Flies Plug into the MatrixScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

One tiny sea parasite survives 200 times atmospheric pressureKnown as the seal louse, this tiny insect can survive deep oceanic dives on its mobile home, a marine mammal.

Science News For Students Shared .

France: Covid cases hit record high as anger grows over restrictions16,096 infections recorded in one day and numbers needing hospital treatment rising.

The Guardian Shared .

Hope for life on Venus survives for centuries against all oddsEarly scientists often assumed that Venus, though hotter than Earth, hosted life.

Science News Shared .

Covid-19 News: Live UpdatesSpeaker Nancy Pelosi, under pressure from moderate Democrats to work toward a deal with the White House, laid the groundwork for action on a stimulus bill.

The New York Times Shared .

Asteroid news: NASA's OSIRIS-REx starts countdown to ‘Touch and Go' missionASTEROID observers at space agency NASA have announced a 'historic moment' is on the horizon for their OSIRIS-REx Bennu sample mission.

Express Shared .

Researchers Take Organoids a Step FurtherThe human body is made of many different kinds of cells, which can often be cultured in a lab and studied.

LabRoots Shared .

Spanish Flu second wave graphs: Did the 1918 pandemic have a second wave?SPANISH FLU killed at least 40 million people. But was a second wave of the virus solely responsible for the grim 1918 death toll?

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Boris Johnson is delaying the inevitable againThe prime ministers inadequate new measures are a product of his reckless nature, says Guardian columnist Polly Toynbee.

The Guardian Shared .

Russia's Venus claim ‘may come back to haunt humanity' as China and US set sights on MarsRUSSIA's claim to Venus 'may come back to haunt humanity' as leading experts reveal to Express.co.uk how the Space Race 2 is mapping out in the cosmos.

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Does Cannabis Affect Cognition in Older People?Encouragingly though, a new human study seems to show no cause for alarm-in this case, patients beyond middle age consuming cannabis for chronic pain showed no differences in cognitive performance as compared to non-users of cannabis, also with chronic pain.

LabRoots Shared .

What Drives Essential Sensing in Animals?Researchers at Northwestern University have developed a new theory that can predict animal sensation. "Anima - Technology"

LabRoots Shared .

Ultrapotent compound may help treat C. diff, reduce recurrenceNow, Purdue University innovators have advanced novel compounds they developed to help treat patients with C.

EurekAlert! Shared .

Historical racial and ethnic health inequities account for disproportionate COVID-19 impactSept. 22, 2020 - A new Viewpoint piece published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society examines the ways in which COVID-19 disproportionately impacts historically disadvantaged communities of color in the United States, and how baseline inequalities in our health system are amplified by the pandemic.

EurekAlert! Shared .

Novel neuroimaging study on dissociative symptoms reveals wounds of childhood traumaA team led by investigators at McLean Hospital has now found that brain imaging analyses can uncover changes in functional connections between brain regions linked to a specific individual's dissociative symptoms following trauma.

EurekAlert! Shared .

High-performance single-atom catalysts for high-temperature fuel cellsPlatinum -based catalysts demonstrate such excellent performance in fuel cell electrode reactions. However, at high temperatures, the Pt atoms are not stable and easily agglomerate.

EurekAlert! Shared .

The male Y chromosome does more than we thoughtWhile the Y chromosome's role was believed to be limited to the functions of the sexual organs, an University of Montreal's scientist has shown that it impacts the functions of other organs as well.

EurekAlert! Shared .

Fluttering Feathers Could Spawn New SpeciesFork-tailed flycatchers make a fluttering sound with their wings-but separate subspecies have different and fluttering.

Scientific American Shared .

Pregnancy Cannabis Use Linked With Psychotic Behaviors in OffspringWomen are already warned that using marijuana during pregnancy might affect their baby's growth in the womb, but a new study published September 23rd in JAMA Psychiatry adds a further layer of concern: females who use cannabis while carrying may have a higher risk of their offspring exhibiting psychotic-like behaviors.

LabRoots Shared .

Fight to protect Koonwarra fossil bed from works on South Gippsland HighwaySouth Gippsland residents are concerned, road crews working to straighten a dangerous highway could destroy priceless prehistoric fossil beds.

ABC Science News Shared .

Super surrogate livestock breeding: Research shows males can produce sperm of other males with genetic engineeringA US scientist says new research shows it is possible to use CRISPR genetic engineering to sterilise males and make their bodies produce the sperm of other males.

ABC Science News Shared .

High Arctic Polar Bears are Temporarily Benefitting from Climate ChangeFor the past few decades, polar bears have been harbingers of climate change. However, not every polar bear subpopulation is experiencing or reacting - Plants And Animals.

LabRoots Shared .

Trump Administration to Announce Plan to Open Tongass Forest to LoggingThe effort to open the Alaskan wilderness area, the nation's largest national forest, has been in the works for about two years.

The New York Times Shared .

Coronavirus live news: France sees record new cases; virus may be becoming more contagiousUS scientists believe virus is mutating, becoming more contagious but not more deadly; EU warns pandemic worse now than at the March peak in several member countries.

The Guardian Shared .

Extreme Isolation can Cause Physical Brain ChangesBy this point in the year, you've either heard or uttered the phrase "quarantine brain." While the actual cognitive or physiological effe - Health And Medicine.

LabRoots Shared .

Blue Cross Insurers Reach Tentative Settlement in Antitrust LawsuitThe health insurance group may pay $2.7 billion to resolve allegations that the chain blocked competition.

The New York Times Shared .

Rheumatic heart disease has turned Tenaya Bell's life upside downTenaya Bell was just seven when she was admitted to intensive care with a disease that experts say should not even exist in a country as wealthy as Australia.

ABC Science News Shared .

Cuvier's Beaked Whale Sets New Diving RecordMarine mammals are uniquely adapted to dive to incredible depths. New research from Duke University Marine Laboratory documented a new dive record by a Cuv - Plants And Animals.

LabRoots Shared .

Virus Cases Surged in Young Adults. The Elderly Were Hit Next.Infections among young adults eventually may have spread to older, more vulnerable people, the C.D.C. reported.

The New York Times Shared .

The Atomic ScarThe creation of atomic weaponry changed human civilization forever, but it also left its mark on the Earth itself - in both obvious and subtle ways.

Stuff To Blow Your Mind Shared .

Authorities hope to free more than 100 pilot whales stranded on Tasmania's West Coast before disposal beginsNew volunteers will focus on freeing 20 pilot whales stranded on a sandbar on Tasmania's West Coast before crews turn their attention to containing and disposing of the hundreds of dead animals throughout the harbour, as the mission enters a fifth day.

ABC Science News Shared .

Novavax Enters Final Stage of Coronavirus Vaccine TrialsThe Maryland company, which has never brought a vaccine to market, has started its Phase 3 trial in the United Kingdom, with plans to begin in the United States in October.

The New York Times Shared .

Ig Nobel Prize awarded for drunk earthworm subwoofer test in scientist's backyardIt started as an exercise in curiosity, placing earthworms on a subwoofer in a backyard shed.

ABC Science News Shared .

Analyzing Genetic Mutations in Pulmonary Arterial HypertensionWith the advancement of genomics and genome sequencing, it has become possible for researchers to study diseases down to their very blueprints.

LabRoots Shared .

Why CovidWhile vaccines against Covid - 19 are being developed at unprecedented speed, none of them have been tested to see if they can actually stop transmission of the virus.

Science in Action Shared .

Researchers Create Detailed Map of Human HeartA multinational team of scientists led by Harvard Medical School, Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Wellcome Sanger Institute, Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine and Imperial College London has created a detailed cellular and molecular map of six anatomical adult heart regions.

Sci News Shared .

Bird Brains Are Far More Humanlike Than Once ThoughtScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

Migrating Tornadoes Bring Heightened Danger to the SoutheastScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

Colombian miners strike fossilized gold: a mastodonFossils of a mastodon, a giant prehistoric relative of today's elephants, have been discovered at an artisanal gold mine in central Colombia in a find which researchers say could herald a trove of similar specimens.

Reuters Shared .

Ocean Heat Waves Are Directly Linked to Climate ChangeThe "blob" of hotter ocean water that killed sea lions and other marine life in 2014 and 2015 may become permanent.

The New York Times Shared .

How the Pandemic Transformed This Songbird's CallWhen the San Francisco Bay Area locked down, urban noise levels plummeted. In response, the white-crowned sparrow changed its tune.

Wired UK Shared .

Remains of Jurassic sea predator found in Chile's Atacama desertReuters) - Scientists have unearthed the remains of Jurassic sea predators resembling killer whales in the world's driest desert in Chile.

Reuters Shared .

Operating in wet conditionsSolar Cells The high efficiency of the complex organic molecule Spiro-OMeTAD as a hole-transporting material for perovskite solar cells requires the use of hygroscopic dopants that decrease stability.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

The heat is onOcean Temperature Anthropogenic climate change is causing not only more episodes of historically high air temperatures but also more frequent spells of unusually increased ocean temperatures.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Dissecting membrane dislocationStructural Biology Mistargeting and misinsertion of membrane proteins causes proteostasis stress and dysfunction of intracellular organelles, which can lead to disease.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Fumarate targets pyroptosisImmunometabolism A form of inflammatory cell death called pyroptosis depends on the caspase-mediated cleavage of gasdermin D , the fragments of which assemble into permeability pores that then kill the cell.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Basic principles of bird and mammal brainsNeuroscience Mammals can be very smart. They also have a brain with a cortex. It has thus often been assumed that the advanced cognitive skills of mammals are closely related to the evolution of the cerebral cortex.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Duality of roaming mechanism in H2COChemical Physics The phenomenon of roaming in chemical reactions has attracted a great deal of attention in the chemical reaction dynamics community over the past decade and still demonstrates unexpected results.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

A dynamic viral spikeCoronavirus Efforts to protect human cells against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 have focused on the trimeric spike protein.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Mapping primordial reaction networksPrebiotic Chemistry Chemists seeking to understand the origins of life have published a wide range of reactions that may have yielded the building blocks of proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids from simple precursors.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Making metallic ribbonsGraphene In its usual two-dimensional form, graphene does not have an energy gap in its electronic structure.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Modeling SARS-CoV-2 in miceCoronavirus Among the research tools necessary to develop medical interventions to treat severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infections, high on the list are informative animal models with which to study viral pathogenesis.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Tipsy microglia binge on synapsesAlcohol Addiction Alcohol abuse has detrimental cognitive and behavioral consequences. Binge drinking is associated with anxiety in humans and, in mice, activates resident phagocytic immune cells in the brain called microglia.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Antarctic ice sheet melting and climateClimate Change The massive West Antarctic Ice Sheet is now melting at an accelerated rate in response to anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions, and exactly how this will affect global climate remains poorly understood.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Immunology through a human lensImmunology The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has underscored the critical need to better understand the human immune system and how to unleash its power to develop vaccines and therapeutics.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Reconfiguring an immune responseImmune Systems The deep sea is a vast and generally empty environment. Finding a mate can thus be difficult.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Dark skies and bright satellitesMost ground-based observatories require a dark night sky to uncover answers to some of the most fundamental questions about the nature of our Universe.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Understanding quantum cause and effectIf you read a randomly selected nontechnical account of quantum entanglement, you will likely be told that measuring a particle in one place can instantly change another particle elsewhere, no matter the distance between the two.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Despite obstacles, WHO unveils plan to distribute vaccineScience's COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Pulitzer Center and the Heising-Simons Foundation The World Health Organization this week announced advances in its effort to ensure the entire world, not just wealthy countries, will benefit from successful COVID-19 vaccines.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Turkey targets critics of its pandemic responseScience's COVID-19 reporting is supported by the Pulitzer Center and the Heising-Simons Foundation In April, Kayıhan Pala, a prominent public health expert at Uludağ University in northwestern Turkey, was shocked to find himself the target of a criminal complaint.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Curved scour marks trace the directions of ancient quakesMany of the world's most dangerous earthquake faults are a silent menace: They have not ruptured in more than a century.

Science | AAAS Shared .

The short, strange life of quantum radarBICKEL/ SCIENCE The researchers compared the sensitivity of a detector relying on the entangled pulses with a conventional one sending out single pulses of laser light, also known as coherent states.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Sizing up a green carbon sinkForests are having their moment. Because trees can vacuum carbon from the atmosphere and lock it away in wood, governments and businesses are embracing efforts to fight climate change by reforesting cleared areas and planting trees on a massive scale.

Science | AAAS Shared .

A tropical research treasure faces difficult timesNonprofit known for its training programs and field stations is undergoing financial challenges compounded by pandemic.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Transformative tools for parasitic flatwormsSchistosomes, a type of parasitic flatworm, are complex multicellular pathogens with an oversized and probably underestimated impact on human health.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Preventing pores and inflammationBICKEL/ SCIENCE Canonical NLRP3 inflammasome formation is linked to many chronic inflammatory diseases, including type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, and gout, so inhibition of this pathway is of considerable therapeutic interest.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Birds do have a brain cortex—and thinkThe term "birdbrain" used to be derogatory. But humans, with their limited brain size, should have known better than to use the meager proportions of the bird brain as an insult.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Intense x-rays can be excitingBICKEL/ SCIENCE Stimulated x-ray Raman scattering in a dense medium has previously been observed by a collective experiment.

Science | AAAS Shared .

News at a glanceLIU/ SCIENCE As the COVID-19 pandemic forced many summer conferences to adopt virtual formats, the option to attend from home—often with discounted or free registration—led to surges in participation.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Seeking a nicheCosta Rica is producing a new generation of skilled tropical biologists. But many can't find jobs at home.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Nonlinear x-ray spectroscopySpectroscopy The extension of nonlinear optics to the x-ray spectral domain is a promising direction in the development of x-ray spectroscopy.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Dogs return to the showConservation The ancient dogs of Oceania include several lineages with Asian ancestry that have since evolved across the South Pacific for more than 3000 years.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Fumarate targets pyroptosisImmunometabolism A form of inflammatory cell death called pyroptosis depends on the caspase-mediated cleavage of gasdermin D , the fragments of which assemble into permeability pores that then kill the cell.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Consciousness sharedConsciousness Humans have tended to believe that we are the only species to possess certain traits, behaviors, or abilities, especially with regard to cognition.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Y chromosome evolution in NeanderthalsY Evolution The genomes of archaic hominins have been sequenced and compared with that of modern humans.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Remediating malalignmentOsteoarthritis Joint alignment affects cartilage and bone degeneration in osteoarthritis. Haberkamp et al. studied site-specific differences in cartilage and bone damage in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Schistosome biology illuminatedParasite Genetics Schistosomiasis is caused by a parasitic flatworm about which little is known. Therefore, options to combat human disease caused by schistosome infection are limited.

Science | AAAS Shared .

An Olympic curling robotArtificial Intelligence The Olympic sport of curling is played on an ice sheet that is prone to changes throughout a match.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Cerebrospinal fluid snapshotNeuroimmunology The central nervous system features mechanisms to protect against untoward inflammation while allowing immune surveillance for pathogens.

Science | AAAS Shared .

A bacterial battlegroundSymbiosis The white button mushrooms that many of us enjoy eating are subject to brown blotch disease caused by the bacterium Pseudomonas tolaasii.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Identifying the weakest linksEcology Faced with mass extinction, how do we prioritize conservation needs? Disruption of pollination could compromise reproduction for many plant species, and reduction of seed dispersal could have devastating effects for many tree species.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Carotenoids drive chromoplast developmentPlant Biochemistry Carotenoid-rich cellular structures called chromoplasts are a source of the rich reds and yellows in the fruits and flowers of plants.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Identity by associationStem Cells Tissue homeostasis and regeneration after injury involve coordinated dynamics for the self-renewal and differentiation of cells.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Operating in wet conditionsSolar Cells The high efficiency of the complex organic molecule Spiro-OMeTAD as a hole-transporting material for perovskite solar cells requires the use of hygroscopic dopants that decrease stability.

Science | AAAS Shared .

The heat is onOcean Temperature Anthropogenic climate change is causing not only more episodes of historically high air temperatures but also more frequent spells of unusually increased ocean temperatures.

Science | AAAS Shared .

Schistosome biology illuminatedParasite Genetics Schistosomiasis is caused by a parasitic flatworm about which little is known. Therefore, options to combat human disease caused by schistosome infection are limited.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Consciousness sharedConsciousness Humans have tended to believe that we are the only species to possess certain traits, behaviors, or abilities, especially with regard to cognition.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Y chromosome evolution in NeanderthalsY Evolution The genomes of archaic hominins have been sequenced and compared with that of modern humans.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Remediating malalignmentOsteoarthritis Joint alignment affects cartilage and bone degeneration in osteoarthritis. Haberkamp et al. studied site-specific differences in cartilage and bone damage in patients with knee osteoarthritis.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Nonlinear x-ray spectroscopySpectroscopy The extension of nonlinear optics to the x-ray spectral domain is a promising direction in the development of x-ray spectroscopy.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

An Olympic curling robotArtificial Intelligence The Olympic sport of curling is played on an ice sheet that is prone to changes throughout a match.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Cerebrospinal fluid snapshotNeuroimmunology The central nervous system features mechanisms to protect against untoward inflammation while allowing immune surveillance for pathogens.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Logic at the cell surfaceProtein Design A major challenge in medical interventions is to target only diseased cells. Although there are biomarkers characteristic of certain cancers, for example, it is unlikely that a single marker can specify a particular cell type.

Science this Week | AAAS Shared .

Vikings Weren't All Scandinavian, Ancient DNA Study ShowsIn the popular imagination, Vikings were fearsome blonde-haired warriors from Scandinavia who used longboats to carry out raids across Europe in a brief but bloody reign of terror.

Sci News Shared .

Air Force, SpaceX mum about sky-high rocket costsFive years ago, Elon Musk, the multibillionaire CEO of the SpaceX rocket company, smashed his way into the business of launching U.S. military and intelligence satellites, a lucrative market that had been cornered for nearly a decade by United Launch Alliance.

Phys.org Shared .

A minuscule spacecraft joins a pilot's epic journey to fly from pole to poleOn November 16, 2019, pilot and author Robert DeLaurentis took off on an ambitious adventure.

Phys.org Shared .

Researchers examine COVID-19 impact on manufacturingResearchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have examined how manufacturers are—or aren't—pivoting successfully in response to major manufacturing disruptions as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Phys.org Shared .

A question of quantum realityPhysicist Reinhold Bertlmann of the University of Vienna, Austria has published a review of the work of his late long-term collaborator John Stewart Bell of CERN, Geneva in EPJ H. This review, "Real or Not Real: that is the question," explores Bell's inequalities and his concepts of reality and explains their relevance to quantum information and...

Phys.org Shared .

Overpriced? Researchers explain artificial price increases in the taxi app UberApps such as Uber are an important mobility feature in many big cities. Driving others from A to B in their own car has become a job for many people.

Phys.org Shared .

It's a boy: Tahlequah's baby orca is frolicking, healthyTahlequah's new calf is a male, the Center for Whale Research has confirmed.

Phys.org Shared .

Bridging the gap between the magnetic and electronic properties of topological insulatorsScientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology shed light on the relationship between the magnetic properties of topological insulators and their electronic band structure.

Phys.org Shared .

Caribbean islands face loss of protection and biodiversity as seagrass loses terrainTropical islands have an important ally when it comes to battling storms and sea-level rise: seagrass.

Phys.org Shared .

Air pollution leads to increase in electricity usage, study suggestsHigh levels of air pollution are forcing people inside to consume more electricity, subsequently causing even greater environmental problems by increasing greenhouse gas emissions.

Phys.org Shared .

US parents delaying preschool and kindergarten amid pandemicClaire Reagan was feeling overwhelmed as her oldest child's first day of kindergarten approached and with a baby on the way.

Phys.org Shared .

Ecotourism gem reduced to ashes as Brazil wetlands burnDomingas Ribeiro remembers how powerless she felt as the flames devastating the Pantanal wetlands burned through the ecotourism hotel she had spent the past year developing in central Brazil.

Phys.org Shared .

A Brazilian city devastated by COVID-19 may have reached herd immunityUp to half of Manaus was infected at the epidemic's peak, which slowed further spread of the virus but also led to many deaths, scientists say.

Science News Shared .

Coronavirus continuing to mutate, study finds, as US cases riseExperts believe virus is probably becoming more contagious but US study did not find mutations made it more lethal.

The Guardian Shared .

Asteroid 2020 SW Flew Safely Past Earth TodayA small near-Earth asteroid designated 2020 SW made its closest approach to Earth today at 7:12 a.m.

Sci News Shared .

Royal Society Science Book PrizeLast week the non-COVID news was all about how we'd failed yet again to halt the rate of biodiversity loss.

BBC Inside Science Shared .

Optimizing of VCSEL photon lifetime for minimum energy consumption at varying bit ratesThe explosive growth of internet use leads to an explosion of the energy consumption of data centers.

Phys.org Shared .

Driven by climate, more frequent, severe wildfires in Cascade Range reshape forestsIn recent years—and 2020 is no exception—parts of the Pacific Northwest that are typically too wet to burn are experiencing more frequent, severe and larger wildfires due to changes in climate.

Phys.org Shared .

Newly identified 'landfalling droughts' originate over oceanMeteorologists track hurricanes over the oceans, forecasting where and when landfall might occur so residents can prepare for disaster before it strikes.

Phys.org Shared .

Scientists discover why tarantulas come in vivid blues and greensWhy are some tarantulas so vividly colored? Scientists have puzzled over why these large, hairy spiders, active primarily during the evening and at night-time, would sport such vibrant blue and green as they were long thought to be unable to differentiate between colors, let alone possess true color vision.

Phys.org Shared .

Penicillium camemberti: a history of domestication on cheeseThe white, fluffy layer that covers Camembert is made of a mold resulting from human selection, similar to the way dogs were domesticated from wolves.

Phys.org Shared .

Searching together: A lesson from ratsThe rat in a maze might be one of the most classic paradigms in the study of behavior, but an international team of scientists has put a twist on this experimental motif to push the leading edge of technology and research into search strategies of collectives.

Phys.org Shared .

One of the world's driest deserts is the focus of a new study on our changing climateWhile the natural carbon cycle should be balanced each year, with about as much carbon taken out of the atmosphere as is released back by natural processes, humans are upsetting this balance through carbon dioxide additions to the atmosphere, both through changing land use that releases carbon stored in soils and from burning fossil fuels.

Phys.org Shared .

Camera traps show impact of recreational activity on wildlifeThe COVID-19 pandemic has fired up interest in outdoor activities in our parks and forests.

Phys.org Shared .

Young physicist 'squares the numbers' on time travelParadox-free time travel is theoretically possible, according to the mathematical modeling of a prodigious University of Queensland undergraduate student.

Phys.org Shared .

New international research has found 25% of carnivorous plant species may be at risk of extinctionNew international research led by Curtin University has found approximately a quarter of carnivorous plant species across the world may be at risk of extinction due to global climate change, illegal poaching, and the clearing of land for agriculture, mining and development.

Phys.org Shared .

Island-building in Southeast Asia created Earth's northern ice sheetsThe Greenland ice sheet owes its existence to the growth of an arc of islands in Southeast Asia—stretching from Sumatra to New Guinea—over the last 15 million years, a new study claims.

Phys.org Shared .

2-In-1: Stroke Scans Also Diagnose COVIDKing's College London researchers took a closer look at emergency room CT scans of patients suspected of having a stroke and made a surprising discovery: the scans could also be used to indicate the presence of COVID-19 infection.

LabRoots Shared .

Scientists Sequence Genome of Alexander Fleming's Original FungusA team of researchers from Imperial College London, the University of Oxford and CABI has successfully sequenced the genome of Alexander Fleming's original fungal strain behind the discovery of penicillin, now classified as Penicillium rubens, and compared it to those of two ‘high producing' industrial strains of Penicillium rubens and the...

Sci News Shared .

Sweden: Bones of dog found at Stone Age burial siteArchaeologists on Thursday reported finding the remains of a dog from more than 8,400 years ago at a human burial site in southern Sweden.

Phys.org Shared .

Microaggressions aren't just innocent blunders, and new research links them with racial biasA white man shares publicly that a group of Black Harvard graduates "look like gang members to me" and claims he would have said the same of white people dressed similarly.

Phys.org Shared .

Photopyroelectric microfluidics developed by researchersPrecisely manipulating various liquids is essential in many fields and unlike solid objects, fluids are intrinsically divisible.

Phys.org Shared .

A Trump-Biden Debate Without Climate Change Is InexcusableThe West is on fire, the Gulf Coast is under water, and voters want candidates to talk about the environment.

Wired UK Shared .

Rate prediction for homogeneous nucleation of methane hydrateMethane hydrates are the single biggest source of fossil fuel on planet earth and play a role in climate change.

Phys.org Shared .

Remember That Coronavirus You Once Met? Your T Cells Do.The SARS-CoV-2 virus was first identified in December 2019 in Wuhan, Hubei, China and quickly escalated to a pandemic status.

LabRoots Shared .

Research concludes that remote learning might not be a bad thingRemote and blended approaches to teacher education can be as effective as face-to-face approaches concludes a new study from the University of Birmingham.

Phys.org Shared .

The return of the spin echoA research team from Garching and Vienna discovered a remarkable echo effect that offers exciting new possibilities for working with quantum information.

Phys.org Shared .

Venusian Tesserae Feature Layered, Folded and Eroded RocksA significant portion of some of the oldest terrain on Venus, known as tesserae, has striations consistent with layering, according to new research led by North Carolina State University.

Sci News Shared .

Expert compares 'involuntary consent' of essential workers to exploitation of women in the adult film industrySome essential workers might agree to work a certain job for money. Some might do so out of a sense of duty.

Phys.org Shared .

Gravity causes homogeneity of the universeGravity can accelerate the homogenization of space-time as the universe evolves. This insight is based on theoretical studies of the physicist David Fajman of the University of Vienna.

Phys.org Shared .

Frequency of combined droughts and heatwaves has substantially increased in western U.S. over past 50 yearsA team of researchers from Canada, Iran and the U.S. has found that the frequency of combined droughts and heatwaves has increased substantially in the western U.S. over the past half-century.

Phys.org Shared .

Turning Pulsars into Deep Space BeaconsNavigating beyond Earths orbit is tricky. Any misstep in movement could lead to the crushes of space probes and vessels.

LabRoots Shared .

Researchers develop a 'stretching rack' for cellsThe behavior of cells is controlled by their environment. Besides biological factors or chemical substances, physical forces such as pressure or tension are also involved.

Phys.org Shared .

Faint orbital debris that threatens satellites not being monitored closely enough, warn astronomersUniversity of Warwick astronomers are warning that orbital debris posing a threat to operational satellites is not being monitored closely enough, as they publish a new survey finding that over 75% of the orbital debris they detected could not be matched to known objects in public satellite catalogs.

Phys.org Shared .

Impurities enhance polymer LED efficienciesMolecular dynamics simulations have shown that the mysteriously high efficiency of polymer LEDs arises from interactions between triplet excitons in their polymer chains, and unpaired electrons in their molecular impurities.

Phys.org Shared .

'If you call 000… I will send you back to your country': How COVID-19 has trapped temporary visa holdersAt the first sign of lockdown due to COVID-19 in Australia and across the globe, there were concerns domestic and family violence would increase in prevalence and intensity.

Phys.org Shared .

Shorebirds more likely to divorce after successful breedingAn international team of scientists studying shorebirds, led by the University of Bath, has found that successful plover parents are more likely to divorce after nesting than those that did not successfully breed, in contrast to most other bird species which tend to split up after nest failure.

Phys.org Shared .

Key genetic clue missing in fight against superbugsFor the first time, researchers have discovered how antibiotic resistance genes are spreading, at a continental scale, via bacterial plasmids in the hospital superbug, Klebsiella pneumoniae.

Phys.org Shared .

It's a man's world: How policies compound the pain for women in the age of COVID-19COVID-19 times have brought sober realizations about deep shifts in Australian society. Encroaching steadily over the past half-century, these have been largely submerged from daily view, until now.

Phys.org Shared .

Reminders of inequality for poor people prod them to be more likely to want to tax the richA pair of political science researchers at the University of California, has found that showing people a symbol of inequality can push them to demand that rich people be taxed more.

Phys.org Shared .

New chronology of the Saturn systemA new chronology for the moons of Saturn has been developed by Planetary Science Institute Associate Research Scientist Samuel W. Bell.

Phys.org Shared .

Landmark release sees bilbies return to Sturt National Park in NSWBilbies are once again bounding in Sturt National Park more than a century after they were declared extinct in NSW.

Phys.org Shared .

Fungal highways let bacteria travel in exchange for thiamineTiny organisms head out on the highway, looking for adventure like they've ridden straight out of the 1960s rock hit, "Born to Be Wild." Researchers from Japan have discovered that while perhaps not as thrill-seeking, bacteria do indeed travel on fungal highways and pay a toll in return.

Phys.org Shared .

How universities can manage student anxiety about coronavirus on campusStudents have returned to UK universities, and the timing couldn't be worse. Some in the medical community have argued that the key to safe reopening is to do so at a time when community transmission is minimal.

Phys.org Shared .

Histone degradation after DNA damage enhances repairDNA damage can occur anywhere in the genome, but most DNA is wrapped around nucleosomes making it inaccessible to the repair machinery.

Phys.org Shared .

The strange storms on JupiterAt the south pole of Jupiter lurks a striking sight—even for a gas giant planet covered in colorful bands that sports a red spot larger than the earth.

Phys.org Shared .

Improving Asian buffalo breeds with genomicsSelective breeding of water buffalo and cattle with the help of genomics could help increase livestock productivity, thereby improving food security, nutrition and incomes for millions of smallholder farmers in Asia, says a new study.

Phys.org Shared .

Company outlines steps to reduce ammonia emissionsA new marginal abatement cost curve for ammonia emissions has been published by Teagasc. The publication is titled "An Analysis of the Cost of the Abatement of Ammonia Emissions in Irish Agriculture to 2030," and outlines the steps that can be taken to reduce ammonia emissions from Irish agriculture and the costs of achieving this.

Phys.org Shared .

Researchers depict the formation of galaxiesAn international team of astronomers, with researchers at Leiden Observatory playing a leading role, has mapped the fuel for galaxy formation in the iconic Hubble Ultra Deep Field.

Phys.org Shared .

Despite frog-killing disease, researchers discover new frog speciesScientists have discovered a new species of rare frog that is rapidly disappearing. At the same time, they've also discovered hope.

Phys.org Shared .

New Zealand companies lag behind others in their reporting on climate change, and that's a risk to their reputationNew Zealand's top 30 corporations do a poor job reporting on climate change compared with similar Australian and Fortune Global 500 companies, according to our research.

Phys.org Shared .

New study models impact of rising fossil fuel prices on employmentA recent study published in Clean Technologies and Environmental Policy reveals new findings on the impact of fossil fuel prices on employment.

Phys.org Shared .

Marine bacteria shift between lifestyles to get the best resourcesTo stay, or not to stay? When it comes to nutrient resource patches, researchers from Japan and Switzerland have discovered that marine bacteria have a knack for exploiting them efficiently, timing movements between patches to get the best resources.

Phys.org Shared .

Dark web WARNING: Experts exposes true extent of threat from black marketTHE Dark Web is driving a worrying new wave of criminality, security analysts have announced.

Express Shared .

What Research in Antarctica Tells Us about the Science of IsolationWhile the members of Heitland's crew conducted research on the earth's iciest continent, they themselves were also being studied by researchers interested in how extreme work environments trigger neurological changes.

Scientific American Shared .

Can a Genetically Modified Bug Combat a Global Farm Plague?Biotech company Oxitec has created a caterpillar with self-destructing eggs in an attempt to curb agricultural damage.

Wired UK Shared .

Does 'Brain Training' Actually Work?Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

When and Why You Should Get a Flu ShotScientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.

Scientific American Shared .

A dirty and growing problem: Too few toiletsAs the famous book says, everybody poops. That's 7.8 billion people, worldwide. For the 2.4 billion with no toilet, the process can be complicated.

Science News For Students Shared .

'Close to 100% accuracy': Helsinki airport uses sniffer dogs to detect CovidResearchers running Helsinki pilot scheme say dogs can identify virus in seconds.

The Guardian Shared .

Is it possible to predict how sick someone could get from Covid-19?Nicola Davis takes a look at the researchers attempting to rapidly work out how to predict who is going to get very sick.

The Guardian Shared .

Life on Earth may have begun in hostile hot springsWhat researchers learn at hot springs and seafloor vents may guide the search for life on icy moons and Mars.

Science News Shared .

UK Covid-19 vaccine trial set to infect healthy volunteers with virusResearchers hope to begin worlds first human challenge trials at east London quarantine facility in January.

The Guardian Shared .

Stalled Talks Over Covid-19 Stimulus in the U.S. Show Signs of LifeIt was far from clear that Republican and Democratic negotiators would be able to reach a deal.

The New York Times Shared .

Life on Mars: Study suggests ‘chemistry of life' CAN lurk beneath Red Planet's surfaceLIFE really could exist on Mars, a landmark new theory about the planet's subsurface biosphere suggests.

Express Shared .

Coronavirus: fifth of people likely to refuse Covid vaccine, UK survey findsThe survey by University College London of 70,000 people, which was launched before lockdown, found that only half considered themselves "very likely" to get vaccinated once there is a Covid vaccine and 10% said they were "very unlikely".

The Guardian Shared .

10,000 more deaths than usual occurred in UK homes since JuneSome 10,000 more deaths than usual have occurred in peoples' private homes since mid June, long after the peak in Covid deaths, prompting fears that people may still be avoiding health services and delaying sending their loved ones to care homes.

The Guardian Shared .

A Computer That Can Map Out Your Thoughts?Almost sounds like science fiction, but researchers at the University of Helsinki are working on creating images based on your thoughts.

LabRoots Shared .

Sky islands and tropical alpine sunflowers at risk of disappearingThe plants that live among the mountaintops of the Andes are among those most threatened by climate change because these species have no place left to go to escape rising temperatures.

EurekAlert! Shared .

Sweet success: Heavy consumption of sugary beverages declined in the US from 2003 to 2016Philadelphia, September 24, 2020 - According to a new study in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, published by Elsevier, the percentage of heavy sugar-sweetened beverage consumers - those who drink more than 500 calories of SSBs daily - trended downwards in the United States between 2003 and 2016.

EurekAlert! Shared .

Provide shady spots to protect butterflies from climate change, say scientistsResearchers have discovered significant variations in the ability of different UK butterfly species to maintain a suitable body temperature.

EurekAlert! Shared .

Choanozoan and picozoan marine protists are probably virus eatersScientists used single-cell genomics to show that two groups of poorly known marine protists routinely ingest viruses.

EurekAlert! Shared .

Climate pledges 'like tackling COVID-19 without social distancing'Current global pledges to tackle climate change are the equivalent of declaring a pandemic without a plan for social distancing, researchers say.

EurekAlert! Shared .

A new strategy of cell entry for some types of parvovirusesResearchers at the Institut national de la recherche scientifique , in collaboration with American scientists, have uncovered a new parvovirus strategy for reaching the cell nucleus which is their site of replication.

EurekAlert! Shared .

Peacock spider feared extinct after Stirling Range bushfire spotted on Bluff KnollA tiny spider species thought possibly to have been wiped out due to a major bushfire is found on the summit of the mountain in WA's south.

ABC Science News Shared .

Seven myths about head lice exposed. Plus how best to treat and prevent them in your familyJust like head lice persist, so do the myths about who gets them and how best to treat them.

ABC Science News Shared .

Chief Executive of Embattled Alaskan Mine Project ResignsThe executive made "offensive" remarks about the state's political leaders, the company said, in meetings recorded by an environmental group.

The New York Times Shared .

The Wild, Wiggly, Weird World of WormsThere are tens of thousands of types of worms on our planet, and these wiggly wonders are oh-so fascinating that we had to put together different stories about them to reveal just how 'wormdeful' they are.

Sci Show Shared .

Deepfake videos increasingly difficult to detect as people, computers struggle to keep upAt a time of a global pandemic, a rise in revenge porn and an upcoming US election, deepfakes are causing experts concern as the lines between reality and fiction become increasingly blurred.

ABC Science News Shared .

Cuvier's beaked whale sets a new record for the longest diveThe animals may rely on large stores of oxygen, a slow metabolism and the ability to tolerate lactic acid to go for hours without surfacing for air.

Science News Shared .

Paleontologist Describes New Genus of Mosasaurs: GnathomortisGnathomortis stadtmani, the only species of the newly-described mosasaur genus, swam in the seas of North America between 79 and 81 million years ago.

Sci News Shared .

Sharks fitted with cameras to monitor, track movements floated as way to understand habitsShark researchers on the Gold Coast want to attach cameras to shark species to better understand their migration and feeding habits.

ABC Science News Shared .